feminism

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feminism

 [fem´ĭ-nizm]
old term for feminization (def. 2).

feminism

[L. femininus]
1. The development of female secondary sexual characteristics in a man.
2. A political philosophy whose aim is to advance the standing of women in society.
See: gynecomastia

feminism

the appearance or existence of female secondary sex characters in the male.
References in periodicals archive ?
With around 50 papers selected out of 80 submissions and distributed across 14 panels, by scholars from the region and around the world to produce research on gender in Arab societies, the conference examined what feminism can accomplish in the next phase, given that the Arab world is presently at the cross roads of different types of crises related to gender in the public sphere.
What is the influence of pop culture on young feminism, and how can young feminists engage productively with it?
ALLYSON MITCHELL: The term "third-wave feminism" began as a positive assertion of feminism after a media blitz about post-feminism or the death of feminism.
Prompted by claims of feminism's increased profile in popular media discourse, this article explores where and how feminism appears in the online Australian women's digital publication Mamamia.
This critique charges feminists who push the state to enact legal reforms with failing their own constituency by not taking into account women that are harmed by the law; it accuses it of inflicting harm on other groups of people by its insistence that women are always subordinated and victimised, and claims that in doing so, feminist narratives deny that women exercise agency at all; it asks whether the feminism that is put to the service of governance reflects the myriad feminisms and resistances that exist; and it questions the unthinking assumption that the legal action that they ask for will translate into tangible benefits for the women they want to help.
While it is true that there are multiple feminisms, it is also true that the various iterations still have a basic understanding in common -- one of absolute equality and the belief that women's rights are in essence human rights," she said.
Most of the new feminisms can be grouped under the rubrics of "post-feminism," "third-wave feminism," or both; these describe a loosely related set of beliefs about the contemporary scope and role of feminism as well as the sites and possibilities for the development and deployment of political agency.
Even if feminism has no functional global subject and "women" aren't a coherent group, anyone who appears to fall into this latter category in any patriarchal formation (so, anywhere) is constituted within it as a "woman" and is consequently subject to what it means to live and move in ordinary space in a female body--to be subject, that is, to a system of gender-based inequity that continues to thrive and in various locations (by which we mean ideological rather than geographical) to be vigorously resurgent.
She shows that black feminism and Chicana feminism emerged simultaneously with women's liberation and that their analyses--incorporating race and class as well as gender--anticipated feminist "intersectional" theorizing of the 1980s.
Halley's focus on governance feminism--radical and culture feminism--similarly tons the risk of obscuring the potential insights of the multiple variants of more marginal feminisms that live more closely on the porous borders between the feminist and the queer.
While they all share a cause, actually defining feminism however is difficult.