feminism


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Related to feminism: Feminist theory, Post feminism

feminism

 [fem´ĭ-nizm]
old term for feminization (def. 2).

feminism

[L. femininus]
1. The development of female secondary sexual characteristics in a man.
2. A political philosophy whose aim is to advance the standing of women in society.
See: gynecomastia

feminism

the appearance or existence of female secondary sex characters in the male.
References in periodicals archive ?
The critique of feminism may "reinvigorat[e] politics by describing problems and constraints anew, by attending to what is hidden, disavowed, or implicit, and by discerning or inventing new possibilities within it.
Feminism is opposed to the tiers of inequity women find themselves trapped in around the globe.
Feminism does not want to see any person empowered at the expense of others.
Today feminism also acknowledges how patriarchy and other forms of social hierarchy can hurt men while giving them benefits at the same time.
By this means, we are provided with a different genealogy than the 1980s women's movement or the post-Black Power movement activism of Black women to account for the rise of contemporary Black feminism, which many link to The Black Woman and subsequently to But Some of Us Are Brave (1984).
Impacting not only women, but society at large An Islamic feminism is arguably an inherently culturally competent one, since Islam in general is a deeply diverse tradition and allows for flexibility depending on contextual realities, so long as core Islamic ethics are not violated.
Social justice feminism is a way to broaden the focus from a rights-based approach to an examination of the dynamics of power and privilege that continue to shape women's lives even when legal rights to equality have been won.
Filomina for instance, posits that "African feminism combines racial, sexual, class and cultural dimensions of oppression to produce a more inclusive brand of feminism through which women are viewed first and foremost as human, rather than sexual beings" (1981:5).
So has feminism been trampled to death under the spikes of a million pairs of ankle-wrenching Manolos?
I challenge the reader to focus on the contributions of Black feminist dialogue; center a call to offer credit to other forms of feminism for progress during past personal missions.
But rather than see this as a failure of feminism as a social movement, the author argues that it is useful to attempt to see the positive effects of an individualist approach to feminism operating at the micro political level (Journal Abstract).
I am writing in response to the January cover story ("Redesigning women: Is the church's new feminism a good fit?