feminine

(redirected from femininities)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

feminine

 [fem´ĭ-nin]
pertaining to the female sex, or having qualities normally characteristic of the female.

feminine

/fem·i·nine/ (fem´ĭ-nin)
1. pertaining to the female sex.
2. having qualities normally asociated with females.

feminine

(fĕm′ə-nĭn)
adj.
1. Of or relating to women or girls.
2. Characterized by or possessing qualities traditionally attributed to women, such as demureness.

fem′i·nine·ly adv.
fem′i·nine·ness, fem′i·nin′i·ty (-nĭn′ĭ-tē) n.

feminine

adjective Referring to characteristics and behaviours traditionally associated with women (e.g., mothering, multitasking, passiveness, emotional empathy).

feminine

pertaining to the female sex, or having qualities normally characteristic of the female.
References in periodicals archive ?
Running the tightrope ": negotiating femininities in the Night Time Economy.
She completed her PhD on women's negotiations of femininities in the Night Time Economy at Newcastle University in August 2015.
Pratibha Parmar, 'Pocket sized Venus', in Del LaGrace Volcano & Ulrika Dahl, Femmes of Power: Exploding Queer Femininities, Serpent's Tail, London 2008, pp91-96.
Among her publications are Femmes of Power: Exploding Queer Femininities (with Del Lagrace Volcano, Serpent's Tail 2007) and Skamgrepp: Femme-inistiska essaer (Leopard, 2014), along with a number of articles on gender equality, femme-inist methodology and theory, formations of gender studies, among other things.
because multiple masculinities and femininities exist, and people practice, and are held accountable to, specific kinds depending on their bodies," we argue that multiple forms of Chicana femininities operate.
20) Chicanas' double bind involves developing gendered practices that incorporate various Chicana/o cultural values, behaviors, and presentations of self within environments that are slowly-accepting some aspects of white femininities as the profession diversifies.
Chicana femininities engage distinctive cultural values and belief systems.
The actual forms their dual femininities take are contextual.
This study is organized into three sections that together illustrate the processes whereby women craft distinctive femininities in key settings such as the courtroom and the firm.
Dual femininities are produced in interaction with clients and colleagues in different worksites.
Our method focuses on the intersections of structure and agency depicted in Chicana narratives that reveal the negotiations that produce distinctive femininities associated with their success in the profession.
The firm provides the context for Chicanas' development of gender practices and deployment of dual femininities through the cases they handle, their interaction with colleagues and clients, and their presentation of self.