feminine

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feminine

 [fem´ĭ-nin]
pertaining to the female sex, or having qualities normally characteristic of the female.

feminine

/fem·i·nine/ (fem´ĭ-nin)
1. pertaining to the female sex.
2. having qualities normally asociated with females.

feminine

(fĕm′ə-nĭn)
adj.
1. Of or relating to women or girls.
2. Characterized by or possessing qualities traditionally attributed to women, such as demureness.

fem′i·nine·ly adv.
fem′i·nine·ness, fem′i·nin′i·ty (-nĭn′ĭ-tē) n.

feminine

adjective Referring to characteristics and behaviours traditionally associated with women (e.g., mothering, multitasking, passiveness, emotional empathy).

feminine

pertaining to the female sex, or having qualities normally characteristic of the female.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is within this context that this article seeks to discuss both masculinities and femininities as they are projected in Zimbabwean political autobiographies.
Zimbabwe's liberation struggles provide distinct models of femininities and masculinities.
Commenting on masculinities and femininities within the political and liberation struggle led by the African National Congress of South Africa (ANC), Suttner (2004) laments:
The South African apartheid dispensation, which forms the background against which the ANC operated and against which masculinities and femininities are analysed by Suttner, is no different, in principle, from the situation obtaining in Rhodesia (which forms the backdrop of the struggle autobiographies that will be discussed in this article).
The discussion in the following section will attempt to demonstrate the interaction between the personal, the social and the political in the construction of masculinities and femininities.
Even his preferred femininities constitute resistance to political domination and military accomplishments as epitomised by his mother and the likes of Joice Mujuru and Serbia.
Tekere has a series of failed marriages and I wish to posit in this article that these are manifestations of his deeply entrenched respect for political and military femininities and alienation from domestic femininities.