female condom


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condom

 [kon´dum]
a sheath or cover worn over the penis during sexual intercourse for contraception and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases.
female condom a long polyurethane sheath that is inserted into the vagina as a contraceptive; it has a flexible ring that fits over the cervix like a diaphragm and another ring that extends outside the vagina. See also contraception.
 Female condom. When correctly in place, the female condom covers the cervix and lines the vaginal canal with the open end outside the vagina. From Nichols and Zwelling, 1997.

female condom

n.
See condom.

female condom

a sheath worn inside the vagina, also extending outward to cover the vulva. It is used to prevent pregnancy or transmission of infection.
A barrier-type contraceptive device worn by a woman, which offers some protection against pregnancy and STDs.
Pros Compatible with oil-based lubricants; greater protection is provided for the external genitalia of both partners; it can be cleaned and re-used up to 10 times without compromising its structural integrity
Cons The device was not enthusiastically adopted after its 1988 launch, given its high cost—$0.72—the skill required to properly deploy it and the rustling sound the material imparted while in use
Success rate FC has an annual pregnancy rate of 21-26% vs ± 15% with a condom

female condom

Vaginal pouch An externally placed contraceptive device, which offers some protection against pregnancy and STDs. See Contraceptives. Cf Condom.

fe·male con·dom

(fē'māl kon'dŏm)
An intravaginal bag, usually latex, which lines the vulva and vagina and is intended to prevent contraception during coitus.
Enlarge picture
FEMALE CONDOM

female condom

An intravaginal device, similar to the male condom, designed to prevent unwanted pregnancy and STDs. It consists of a soft loose-fitting polyurethane sheath closed at one end. A flexible polyurethane ring is inside the closed end, and another sheath is at the open end. The inner ring is used for insertion, covering the cervix as a contraceptive diaphragm does and also for anchoring and positioning the condom well inside the vagina. During use the external ring remains outside the vagina and covers the area around the vaginal opening. This prevents contact between the labia and the base of the penis. The female condom is prelubricated; additional lubrication is provided in the package. It is designed for one-time use. As a contraceptive, it is as effective as other barrier methods.
See: illustration
See also: condom
References in periodicals archive ?
Participants were shown a videotape (available in English and Spanish), (13) which included a discussion and demonstration of female condom use, that was followed by a brief question-and-answer period.
In this spirited short, men's misconceptions about the female condom are dispelled by an informed woman.
In Zimbabwe, after hair stylists in 500 salons were trained to educate women and demonstrate the FC2's correct use, the number of women who reported using the female condom almost doubled: increasing from 15 to 28 percent from 2002 to 2004.
To inform strategies for promoting the female condom to female sex workers in Central America, we conducted formative research with sex workers at three sites in El Salvador and Nicaragua from September 2007 to February 2008.
To increase the use of the female condom, the researchers recommend developing a national strategic plan for female condoms with the input of key stakeholders; ensuring a consistent supply of affordable female condoms; engaging men as supportive partners to women using the product; and setting realistic expectations about uptake.
In all, 108 women enrolled and were randomly assigned to receive either 10 male or 10 female condoms.
Skepticism about the female condom is also based on the lack of continuing interest within some traditional service settings.
We call on these entities to sign agreements in 2006 that will commit them to purchasing a minimum of 180 million of the second-generation female condom for annual global distribution.
Last week female condom manufacturer FHC announced that the second-generation female condom (FC2) would be made available to developing countries, and that smaller, poorer nations would be able to purchase the product by forming a coalition.
However, female condom reuse has been reported in a number of settings, likely because many women cannot afford to buy multiple female condoms.
Most studies done on the female condom show that women are skeptical when it comes to this cumbersome looking contraption, but like it once they get used to it, and would recommend it to others.
Given the trend since 1997 toward increasing rates of sexually transmitted infection (STI/HIV) in Canada (Patrick, Wong, & Jordan, 2000) and the ongoing difficulty of achieving consistent and effective use of condoms and contraception among women and their male partners (Fisher, Boroditsky, & Bridges, 1999; Fisher & Boroditsky, 2000), it is important to examine the use of the female condom as an alternative, or supplement, to existing male condom distribution programs.