felony murder rule


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felony murder rule

A legal doctrine in some (English) common law jurisdictions that broadens the legal ramifications of murder to include:
(1) when an offender kills accidentally or without specific intent to kill in the course of an applicable felony, manslaughter is escalated to murder; and
(2) it makes any participant in the felony criminally liable for any deaths that occur during or in furtherance of that felony.
References in periodicals archive ?
Particularly significant for this examination of proximate cause and the felony murder rule is Mark Alicke's study on "Culpable Causation," which he defines as "the influence of the perceived blameworthiness of an action on judgments of its causal impact on a harmful outcome.
CASE-SPECIFIC IMPLICATIONS OF RESEARCH IN COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY ON THE PROXIMATE CAUSE THEORY OF THE FELONY MURDER RULE
These decisions restrict capital punishment of accomplices in fatal felonies to those whose mental states would suffice for murder liability without the felony murder rule.
13) As a result, the felony murder rule had to be limited in some manner.
28) Compare David Crump, Reconsidering the Felony Murder Rule in Light of Modern Criticisms: Doesn 't the Conclusion Depend Upon the Particular Rule at Issue?
Part C introduces the core doctrine surrounding the felony murder rule in California.
In explaining their sentencing decision after only about three hours of deliberations, the three male members of the jury said they likely would not have even convicted Alvarez on the 11 counts of first-degree murder in the eight-week trial if it had not been for the felony murder rule.
198) First, the Court found that Walters was convicted on two counts of first-degree murder under both the felony murder rule for kidnapping and robbery with a firearm and murder with premeditation and deliberation.
For the utilitarian, the use of the felony murder rule to achieve roughly the same results achievable by a more discerning inquiry is probably good enough reason to leave the felony murder rule in place.
The felony murder rule in Alabama has been codified by state statute 13A-6-2 (a)(3), which states a person is guilty of murder when "he or she commits or attempts to commit .