felon


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whitlow

 [hwit´lo]
herpetic whitlow a primary herpes simplex infection of the terminal segment of a finger, usually seen in those exposed to infected oral or respiratory secretions, such as dentists, physicians, or nurses. It begins with intense itching and pain, followed by the formation of deep coalescing vesicles. The process is associated with much tissue destruction and may be accompanied by systemic symptoms. A similar lesion may occur as a result of nail biting during the course of primary herpetic gingivostomatitis.
melanotic whitlow a malignant tumor of the nail bed characterized by formation of melanotic tissue.

whit·low

(wit'lō),
Purulent infection through a perionychial fold causing an abscess of the bulbous distal end of a finger.
Synonym(s): felon
[M.E. whitflawe]

felon

/fel·on/ (fel´on) a purulent infection involving the pulp of the distal phalanx of a finger.

felon

(fĕl′ən)
n.
A painful purulent infection at the end of a finger or toe in the area surrounding the nail. Also called whitlow.

felon

[fel′ən]
Etymology: L, fel, venom
a suppurative abscess on the distal phalanx of a finger.

felon

Paronychia, whitlow, run-around A purulent infection in the tight fascial plane adjacent to the terminal intraphalangeal joint of the fingers or toes, due to an open wound; as the inflammatory mass expands within the confined space, the vascular supply is compromised, predisposing the site to osteomyelitis, pulp necrosis and sloughing of tissue; the pain is very intense and seemingly disproportionate with the scant amount of swelling and erythema clinically evident Treatment Drainage by incision directly over the site of maximum swelling; the term has also been applied to a localized painful herpetic skin infection 'seeded' in an open abrasion by contact exposure.

fel·on

(fel'ŏn)
A purulent infection or abscess involving the bulbous distal end of a finger.
Synonym(s): whitlow.
[M.E. feloun, malignant]
References in periodicals archive ?
3 million Americans could not vote in the 2008 election because of their status as convicted felons, according to The Sentencing Project.
Now they were able to prosecute this guy not just on felon in possession, but National Firearms Act violations as well.
Prior to '86, the feds governed the prohibition of felons regaining gun rights under the Gun Control Act of 1968, a knee-jerk legislative reaction to the MLK [Martin Luther King Jr.
The closest the Supreme Court came to ruling on the constitutionality of felon possession laws was in Lewis v.
Gilbert knows that most felons are likely to be Democrats is a mystery.
Tubbs Jones says denying felons the right to vote helps put former convicts on the wrong track.
Felon disenfranchisement has a long history, with origins in ancient Greece.
Some Republicans believe that felons are more likely to vote for Democrats than Republicans.
If they don't attempt to stop violating the law, that judge still has all the power to revoke their probation," she said, but "it's the stake [in getting released] that makes probation work, the feeling among state jail felons that they have a chance.
A parliamentary committee was created last week to determine the legitimacy of Parvanov and Marin's actions in granting pardons to felons and okaying Bulgarian citizenship requests.
I believe there is one issue overlooked in the recent debate over admission of felons to The Florida Bar.