fee-for-service insurance

fee-for-service insurance

insurance coverage that reimburses participants and providers following submission of a claim. Participants have few if any restrictions on which hospitals or doctors to use.

fee-for-ser·vice in·sur·ance

(fē'fōr-sĕr'vis in-shŭr'ăns)
Coverage in the U.S. that reimburses participants and providers following submission of a claim. Participants have few, if any, restrictions on which hospitals or doctors to use.

fee-for-ser·vice in·sur·ance

(fē sĕr'vis in-shŭr'ăns)
Insurance coverage that reimburses participants and providers following submission of claim. Participants have few if any restrictions on which hospitals or doctors to use.
References in periodicals archive ?
0 trillion in the coming years, as fee-for-service insurance reimbursement to physicians transitions to more value-based models and high-deductible health insurance plans become more commonplace.
According to industry analysts, patients' out-of-pocket healthcare expenses are expected to reach more than USD1 trillion in the coming years, as fee-for-service insurance reimbursement to physicians transitions to more value-based models and high-deductible health insurance plans become more commonplace.
It proposes reshaping Medicare - currently a government-sponsored, defined benefit fee-for-service insurance system - so future beneficiaries would receive fixed amounts of money to purchase private insurance or buy into the existing government program.
In 1973, Congress authorized prepayment for medical services to explore alternatives to the traditional fee-for-service insurance model, which led to development of new managed-care models across the nation.
Fee-for-service insurance involves a contract between a patient and an insurance company.
How do you document (and charge for) evidence-based care that recommends "watchful waiting" when current fee-for-service insurance codes encourage the use of tests and treatment?
That alternative permits those eligible for Medicare voluntarily to supplement government payments for health insurance premiums with their own funds, if they wish, in order to obtain unrationed, unmanaged, private fee-for-service insurance.
Total out-of-pocket medical spending was significantly higher, on average, for consumer units with fee-for-service insurance ($2,315 per year) than for consumer units covered by a health maintenance organization ($1,789).
Of the nearly 90% of respondents who had fee-for-service insurance, 65% obtained flu shots, and the adjusted racial disparity in vaccination rates was 25%.
For the rest of employers, they would be protected in one of three ways -- all self insured employers would be protected from lawsuits in federal court, employers who offer fee-for-service insurance would be protected because they are not making the medical decisions, or if they contract with the health plan to act as a liable decision maker.
Patients in New York state who undergo coronary artery bypass graft surgery and are covered by either private managed-care or Medicare managed-care insurance are significantly less likely than patients with fee-for-service insurance to have the surgery done in hospitals with lower mortality rates, according to a study published in The Journal of the American Medical Association.
Under the old fee-for-service insurance plans, doctors were paid for whatever services they performed, a system that invited abuses and ultimately fueled skyrocketing insurance costs.