fauces


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fauces

 [faw´sēz]
throat. adj., adj fau´cial.

fau·ces

, gen.

fau·ci·um

(faw'sēz, faw'sē-ŭm), [TA] This word is grammatically plural.
The space between the cavity of the mouth and the pharynx, bounded by the soft palate and the base of the tongue.
See also: isthmus of fauces.
[L. the throat]

fauces

/fau·ces/ (faw´sēz) the passage between the throat and pharynx.fau´cial

fauces

(fô′sēz′)
pl.n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
The passage from the back of the mouth to the pharynx, bounded by the soft palate, the base of the tongue, and the palatine arches.

fau′cal (-kəl), fau′cial (-shəl) adj.

fau·ces

, pl. fauces (faw'sēz) [TA]
The space between the cavity of the mouth and the pharynx, bounded by the soft palate and the base of the tongue.
[L. the throat]

fauces

The narrowed space at the back of the mouth and PHARYNX, under the soft palate and between the soft palatine arches (the pillars of the fauces) on either side from which the throat opens out. The term appears to be a plural of the singular word faux but is, in fact, a singular entity. From Latin, fauces , throat.

fau·ces

, pl. fauces (faw'sēz) [TA]
Area between oral cavity and pharynx, bounded by soft palate and lingual base.

fauces (fô´sēz),

n the archway between the pharyngeal and oral cavities; formed by the tongue, anterior and posterior tonsillar pillars, and soft palate.

fauces

the passage from the mouth to the pharynx.
References in periodicals archive ?
36) Clarke describes how the fauces-atrium-tablinum axis of the house directed the clients in the direction of their patron to the following effect: "A client emerging from the tunnel-like confines of the fauces directly faced the goal of his or her visit, the paterfamilas, standing or seated at the end of the axis in the tablinum and dressed in the toga" (Clarke 1991:4).
To this end, the socially important areas such as the entrance vestibulum and fauces, atrium, tablinum, triclinia, oeci and peristyles usually received the finest colour, most complex design and most detailed and interesting mythological paintings or mosaics (Dunbabin 1999:306-307; Ling 1991:2).
As noted earlier, apart from proof of an overt act of Britain extending the territory of the former colony beyond the low water mark, another exception recognised by British law at the time of Confederation and accepted by the Court in the Georgia Strait Reference were "waters inter fauces terrae (within the jaws of the land), which the common law considered to be .
In severe cases, the tonsillar lesions extended to involve the anterior and posterior pillars of fauces, as well as the soft palate and uvula.
The impluvium-like feature which is arranged eccentrically to the axis running through the middle of the fauces and the tablinum consisted only of a low, rectangular wall.
Las mira, les lanza su soplo atrayente, Y al punto en sus fauces las hace caer.