fatty degeneration


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Related to fatty degeneration: fatty infiltration

degeneration

 [de-gen″ĕ-ra´shun]
deterioration; change from a higher to a lower form, especially change of tissue to a lower or less functionally active form. When there is chemical change of the tissue itself, it is true degeneration; when the change consists in the deposit of abnormal matter in the tissues, it is infiltration. adj., adj degen´erative.
caseous degeneration caseation (def. 2).
cerebromacular degeneration (cerebroretinal degeneration)
1. degeneration of brain cells and of the macula retinae, as occurs in tay-sachs disease.
2. any lipidosis with cerebral lesions and degeneration of the retinal macula.
colloid degeneration degeneration with conversion of the tissues into a gelatinous or gumlike material.
cystic degeneration degeneration with formation of cysts.
fatty degeneration deposit of fat globules in a tissue.
fibroid degeneration degeneration of a leiomyoma with subsequent fibrosis.
hepatolenticular degeneration Wilson's disease.
hyaline degeneration a regressive change in cells in which the cytoplasm takes on a homogeneous, glassy appearance; also used loosely to describe the histologic appearance of tissues.
hydropic degeneration a form in which the epithelial cells absorb much water.
lattice degeneration of retina a frequently bilateral, usually benign asymptomatic condition, characterized by patches of fine gray or white lines that intersect at irregular intervals in the peripheral retina, usually associated with numerous, round, punched-out areas of retinal thinning or retinal holes.
macular degeneration see macular degeneration.
macular degeneration, congenital see stargardt's disease.
macular degeneration, Stargardt's stargardt's disease.
mucoid degeneration degeneration with deposit of myelin and lecithin in the cells.
mucous degeneration degeneration with accumulation of mucus in epithelial tissues.
myofibrillar degeneration damage to selective cardiac cells when surrounding interstitial cells, nerves, and capillaries remain viable.
myxomatous degeneration mucous degeneration.
spongy degeneration of central nervous system (spongy degeneration of white matter) Canavan disease.
subacute combined degeneration of spinal cord degeneration of both the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord, producing various motor and sensory disturbances; it is due to vitamin B12 deficiency and is usually associated with pernicious anemia. Called also Lichtheim's or Putnam-Dana syndrome.
wallerian degeneration fatty degeneration of a nerve fiber that has been severed from its nutritive source.
Zenker's degeneration Zenker's necrosis.

fat·ty de·gen·er·a·tion

abnormal formation of microscopically visible droplets of fat in the cytoplasm of cells, as a result of injury.
Synonym(s): adipose degeneration, steatosis (2)

fatty degeneration

n.
The accumulation of fat globules within the cells of a bodily organ, such as the liver or heart, resulting in deterioration of tissue and diminished functioning of the affected organ. Also called steatosis.

fatty degeneration

Etymology: AS, faett + L, degenerare, to deviate
the abnormal deposition of fat within cells or the invasion of organs by fatty tissue. Also called adipose degeneration.

steatosis

A pattern of reversible cell injury resulting from hypoxia, toxic or metabolic insults, diabetes mellitus, obesity, and protein malnutrition, which consists of an accumulation of droplets of triglcerides/neutral fat in various solid organs—classically, the liver—and most common in alcoholics in whom the changes regress with abstention from alcohol. Fatty changes may also occur in other organs (e.g., heart, muscle, kidney).

fat·ty de·gen·er·a·tion

(fat'ē dĕ-jen'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
Abnormal formation of microscopically visible droplets of fat in the cytoplasm of cells, as a result of injury.
Synonym(s): adipose degeneration, steatosis (2) .

fatty degeneration

An abnormal tissue state featuring the accumulation of tiny fat droplets in the CYTOPLASM of cells. This occurs in severe infections, ISCHAEMIA, and severe nutritional lack and affects especially the liver and the heart.

degeneration

deterioration; change from a higher to a lower form, especially change of tissue to a lower or less functionally active form. When there is chemical change of the tissue itself it is true degeneration; when the change consists in the deposit of abnormal matter in the tissues, it is infiltration. See also wallerian degeneration, Zenker's necrosis.

albuminoid degeneration
cloudy swelling, an early stage of degenerative change characterized by swollen, parboiled-appearing tissues which revert to normal when the cause is removed.
ballooning degeneration
swelling of the cytoplasm in epidermal cells without vacuolization, enlarged or condensed nuclei and acantholysis. A characteristic of viral infections of the skin. Called also koilocytosis.
caseous degeneration
colloid degeneration
degeneration with conversion of the tissues into a gelatinous or gumlike material.
cystic degeneration
degeneration with formation of cysts.
fatty degeneration
deposit of fat globules in a tissue.
feathery degeneration
said of hepatocytes; a hydropic change in hepatocytes which have suffered long-term exposure to cholestasis.
fibrinoid degeneration
deposition or replacement with eosinophilic fibrillar or granular substance resembling fibrin.
fibroid degeneration
degeneration into fibrous tissue.
hyaline degeneration
a regressive change in cells in which the cytoplasm takes on a homogeneous, glassy appearance; also used loosely to describe the histological appearance of tissues. Called also hyalinosis.
hydropic degeneration
see hydropic degeneration.
macular degeneration
degenerative changes in the macula retinae.
mucoid degeneration
degeneration with increased mucin which can be epithelial or mesenchymal in origin.
mucous degeneration
degeneration with accumulation of mucus in epithelial tissues. Called also myxomatous degeneration.
myxomatous degeneration
see mucous degeneration (above).
reticular degeneration
extreme intracellular edema of epidermal cells, resulting in rupture and multilocular intraepidermal vesicles with septae formed by the remaining cell walls. Seen in acute inflammatory dermatoses.
spongy degeneration
on microscopic examination has the physical appearance of a sponge. Usually applied to tissue of the central nervous system, caused by the loss of myelin.

fatty

pertaining to or characterized by fat. See also adipose.

fatty acids
organic compounds of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen that are esterified with glycerol to form fat. All fats are esters of fatty acids and glycerol, the fatty acids accounting for 90% of the molecule of most natural fats. A fatty acid consists of a long chain of carbon atoms with a carboxylic acid group at one end. Saturated fatty acids have no double bonds in the carbon chain. The medium and long chain fatty acids are solid at room temperature and are the components of the common animal fats, such as butter and lard. Unsaturated fatty acids contain one or more double bonds. The unsaturated fatty acids are liquid at room temperature and are found in oils such as olive oil and linseed oil. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have two or more double bonds.
Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) including acetic, butyric and propionic acids are produced in large quantities in the rumen by the fermentative digestion of cellulose. Much of the energy consumption of ruminants comes from these VFAs in the situation in which other animals use glucose. See also 3-omega fatty acid (below).
fatty acid nutritional deficiency
a secondary deficiency occurs in pigs on high-calcium diets. This may have a connection with parakeratosis of pigs caused by zinc deficiency and calcium excess in the diet. Requirements for dietary fat in dogs and cats are usually expressed as the essential linoleic acid and arachidonic acid.
fatty acid synthase
in bacteria, a multiprotein complex; in mammals, a single multifunctional protein important in the synthesis of palmitate as a major source of fatty acids.
fatty acyl CoA
generic term for long hydrocarbon chains, generally between C12 and C20, linked via thioester to coenzyme A.
fatty acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase
enzyme (ACAT) catalyzing the transfer of fatty acyl group to cholesterol, irreversible physiologically. Its action regulates the number of LDL receptors by converting excess cholesterol (which inhibits LDL receptors) to cholesterol esters.
branched chain fatty acids
fatty acids usually containing a methyl branch; lowers the melting point compared with the equivalent straight chain fatty acid.
fatty casts
see urinary cast.
fatty degeneration
deposit of fat globules in a tissue.
essential fatty acids (EFA)
essential fatty acids.
fatty liver
accumulation of fat in a liver beyond the level which is normally encountered may be a result of a normal physiological response to increased peripheral lipolysis, obesity or the action of hepatotoxins.
fatty liver disease
see fat cow syndrome.
fatty liver syndrome
1. a disease of laying birds housed in battery cages. The cause is unknown. Affected birds are significantly heavier, there is a fall in egg production and they die acutely of liver rupture. The liver is greasy, mushy in consistency and yellow in color.
2. a severe fatty accumulation in the liver and hypertriglyceridemia that may develop in obese cats that are anorexic. There is jaundice, weight loss, neurological signs and a high mortality. Called also idiopathic feline hepatic lipidosis.
omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids
include α-linolenic acid, eicosapentanoic acid, docosahexanoic acid. High concentrations found in cold water marine (fish) oils.
omega-6 (n-6) fatty acids
found in terrestrial plants, including safflower oil, corn oil and evening primrose oil, which is a rich source of linoleic and arachidonic acids.
fatty tissue
connective tissue made of fat cells in a meshwork of areolar tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fatty degeneration of the muscles of the rotator cuff: Assessment by computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging.
Influence of cuff muscle fatty degeneration on anatomic and functional outcomes after simple suture of full-thickness tears.
Observations on Fatty Degeneration of the Liver, Guy's Hosp.
Alcoholic-induced fatty liver in humans, which was referred to as fatty degeneration or fatty infiltration, had been common knowledge since the classic writings by 19th century authors.