fat necrosis


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Related to fat necrosis: Subcutaneous fat necrosis

necrosis

 [nĕ-kro´sis, ne-kro´sis] (Gr.)
the morphological changes indicative of cell death caused by enzymatic degradation.
aseptic necrosis necrosis without infection or inflammation.
acute tubular necrosis acute renal failure with mild to severe damage or necrosis of tubule cells, usually secondary to either nephrotoxicity, ischemia after major surgery, trauma (see crush syndrome), severe hypovolemia, sepsis, or burns. See also lower nephron nephrosis.
Balser's fatty necrosis gangrenous pancreatitis with omental bursitis and disseminated patches of necrosis of fatty tissues.
bridging necrosis septa of confluent necrosis bridging adjacent central veins of hepatic lobules and portal triads characteristic of subacute hepatic necrosis.
caseous necrosis caseation (def. 2).
central necrosis necrosis affecting the central portion of an affected bone, cell, or lobule of the liver.
cheesy necrosis caseation (def. 2).
coagulation necrosis death of cells, the protoplasm of the cells becoming fixed and opaque by coagulation of the protein elements, the cellular outline persisting for a long time.
colliquative necrosis liquefactive necrosis.
fat necrosis necrosis in which fat is broken down into fatty acids and glycerol, usually occurring in subcutaneous tissue as a result of trauma.
liquefactive necrosis necrosis in which the necrotic material becomes softened and liquefied.
massive hepatic necrosis massive, usually fatal, necrosis of the liver, a rare complication of viral hepatitis (fulminant hepatitis) that may also result from exposure to hepatotoxins or from drug hypersensitivity.
moist necrosis necrosis in which the dead tissue is wet and soft.
postpartum pituitary necrosis see postpartum pituitary necrosis.
selective myocardial cell necrosis myofibrillar degeneration.
subcutaneous fat necrosis of newborn a benign, self-limited disease affecting term newborns and young infants, characterized by circumscribed, indurated, nodular areas of fat necrosis. It is thought to be related to trauma on bony prominences during delivery, hypothermia, asphyxia, or maternal diabetes; it usually resolves spontaneously by 2 to 4 weeks with no scarring. Called also adiponecrosis neonatorum or subcutanea.
Zenker's necrosis hyaline degeneration and necrosis of striated muscle; called also Zenker's degeneration.

fat ne·cro·sis

the death of adipose tissue, characterized by the formation of small (1-4 mm), dull, chalky, gray or white foci; these represent small quantities of calcium soaps formed in the affected tissue when fat is hydrolyzed into glycerol and fatty acids.
Synonym(s): steatonecrosis

fat necrosis

Etymology: AS, faett + Gk, nekros, dead, osis, condition
a condition caused by trauma or infection in which neutral tissue fats are broken down into fatty acids and glycerol. Fat necrosis occurs most commonly in the breasts and subcutaneous areas. It also may develop in the abdominal cavity after an episode of pancreatitis causes a release of enzymes from the pancreas.
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Fat necrosis

fat necrosis

Liquefactive necrosis initiated by trauma and effected by lipolytic enzymes. See Calcium soap, Necrosis.

fat ne·cro·sis

(fat nĕ-krō'sis)
The death of adipose tissue, typically due to digestive enzymes (e.g., lipase); characterized by the formation of small (1-4 mm), dull, chalky, gray or white foci.
Synonym(s): steatonecrosis.

fat necrosis

Death of body fatty tissue often as a result of exposure to pancreatic enzymes in the condition of acute PANCREATITIS.

fat

1. the adipose or fatty tissue of the body.
2. neutral fat; a triglyceride (or triacylglycerol), which is an ester of fatty acids and glycerol (a trihydric alcohol). Each fat molecule contains one glycerol residue connected by ester linkages to three fatty acid residues, which may be the same or different. The fatty acids may have no double bonds in the carbon chain (saturated fatty acids), one double bond (monounsaturated), or two or more double bonds (polyunsaturated).

fat absorption test
assesses the absorptive capacity of the small intestine, quantitatively by measuring serum lipid levels or qualitatively by plasma turbidity, at timed intervals after the oral administration of fats.
animal fat
a most important abattoir by-product providing edible fat for the human food chain. Products include oleo oil and oleo stearin used in margarine manufacture and dripping for commercial baking. Nonedible fats go to leather dressings, glycerol manufacture and lubricants. Beef and pork fat are the valuable ones, mutton fat having too strong a flavor for edible fat.
boiling (burning) fat
see acrolein poisoning.
fat cattle
a class of beef cattle of any age but usually greater than one year, well-covered and judged ready for slaughter to provide prime cuts of beef.
fat cow syndrome
a syndrome of anorexia and ketonuria that occurs in overfat cows at calving. Precipitated by events that interfere with the cow's feed intake for even short periods. A poor response to treatment and many cows die.
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Fatty liver in fat cow syndrome. By permission from Blowey RW, Weaver AD, Diseases and Disorders of Cattle, Mosby, 1997
crude fat
that part of a feed that is extractable by ether. Includes fat, oil, wax, resin and some pigments.
dietary fat
a rich source of energy for carnivores and omnivores and to a limited extent ruminants. Are usually too expensive for widespread use other than as excipients. They aid in the formation of pellets and in reducing dustiness. Their problem is a tendency to rancidification unless an antioxidant is added.
fat embolism
lesion created by a fat embolus.
fat embolus
globules of fat, sufficient to act as emboli occur usually after trauma or surgery, but can also occur in hyperlipemia, myositis and atherosclerosis.
fat ewe pregnancy toxemia
occurs when there is a voluntary restriction of food intake in late pregnancy associated with lack of ruminal expansion potential caused by excess abdominal fat and multiple fetuses. It is common in hobby sheep farms where it is thought that ewes should lamb with body condition scores greater than 4 rather than less than 3.5.
leaf fat
the best edible fat from a pig carcass, from under the peritoneum.
fat marbling
deposition of fat between muscle fibers. A highly desirable characteristic in beef. Is a guarantee of a carcass from a young animal.
fat necrosis
necrosis in which fat is broken down into fatty acids and glycerol, usually occurring in subcutaneous tissue as a result of trauma. See also lipomatosis.
orbital fat
fat located deep to the eyeball; substantial amounts provide good shock-absorbent surroundings.
perivaginal fat prolapse
during a difficult parturition in a fat cow or heifer perivaginal fat is pushed caudally and bursts through the vaginal wall into the vagina.
fat phanaerosis
conversion in the tissues of invisible fatty substances into fat which can be stained and thus become visible.
fat prolapse
see perivaginal fat prolapse (above).
fat sheep
a class of meat sheep of any age but usually greater than one year, well-covered and judged ready for slaughter to provide prime cuts of mutton.
References in periodicals archive ?
This view is supported by Karochristou et al, (2) who documented a biochemical profile of pseudohypoparathyroidism in a neonate with hypocalcemia associated with subcutaneous fat necrosis.
Case report: false-positive breast screening due to fat necrosis following mammography.
4%) patients with fat necrosis were classified as BI-RADS category 4b, much lower than 41.
In the presence of skin and/or fat necrosis, drainage and debridement should be performed without delay.
In this report, we describe widespread granulomatous coelomic fat necrosis resulting in colonic obstruction in an umbrella cockatoo.
Stage 3 consists of fat necrosis, cyst formation, calcification and new bone formation.
These risks include infection, delayed healing, wound breakdown, and fat necrosis, as well as implant-related problems.
Recurrent ulceration and fat necrosis is associated with lipodermatosclerosis.
Arthritis and intramedullary fat necrosis can develop as a result of disseminated fat necrosis, forming the triad of pancreatitis, panniculitis and polyarthritis (PPP) (3, 4).
This feature has not been described in the literature reports of other cases of MDL, and was thought to be due to either fat necrosis or old haematomas secondary to trauma.
Histologic examination demonstrated abscesses, areas of fat necrosis, and peripheral fibrous changes.