pin

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pin

 [pin]
a slender, elongated piece of metal used for securing fixation of parts.
Steinmann pin a metal rod for the internal fixation of fractures; see also nail extension.

PIN


pin

(pin),
A metallic implant used in surgical treatment of bone fractures.
See also: nail.
[O.E. pinn, fr. L. pinna, feather]

pin

(pin) a slender, elongated piece of metal used for securing fixation of parts.
Steinmann pin  a metal rod for the internal fixation of fractures.

pin

(pĭn)
n.
A thin rod for securing the ends of fractured bones.
v.
To fasten or secure with a pin or pins.

pin

Etymology: AS, pinn
1 v, (in orthopedics) to secure and immobilize fragments of bone with a nail.
2 See nail, def. 2.
3 n, (in dentistry) a small metal rod or peg, used as a support in rebuilding a tooth.

PIN

Abbreviation for:
patient identification number
patient information network
penile intraepithelial neoplasia
personal identification number
Physician Identification Number
posterior interosseous nerve
product identification number
prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia
protein inhibitor of NOS
Public Information Network

PIN

1. Penile intraepithelial neoplasia.
2. Personal identification number A number chosen by a person to verify ID; PINs are used for personal banking, voicemail retrieval, etc.
3. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, see there.

pin

Orthopedics An internal fixation device used to join fractured bone. See Knowles pin, Percutaneous pin, Steinmann pin.

PIN

Abbreviation for prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia; provider identification number.

pin

(pin)
Rod used in surgical treatment of bone fractures.
See also: nail
[O.E. pinn, fr. L. pinna, feather]

pin

(pin)
A metallic implant used in surgical treatment of bone fractures.
See also: nail
[O.E. pinn, fr. L. pinna, feather]

pin,

n a small cylindrical piece of metal.
pin, cemented,
n a metal rod cemented into a hole drilled into dentin to enhance retention of a restoration.
pin, friction-retained,
n a metal rod driven or forced into a hole to enhance retention. It is retained solely by elasticity of dentin.
pin, incisal guide,
n a metal rod that is attached to the upper member of an articulator and that touches the incisal guide table. It maintains the established vertical separation of the upper and lower arms of the articulator.
pin, retention,
n the frictional grip of small metal projections extending from a metal casting into the dentin of the tooth.
pin, self-threading,
n a pin screwed into a hole prepared in dentin to enhance retention.
pin, sprue,
n 1. a solid or hollow length of metal used to attach a pattern to the crucible former.
n 2. a metal pin used to form the hole that provides the pathway through the refractory investment to permit the entry of metal into a mold.
pin, Steinmann,
n.pr a firm metal pin that is sharpened on one end; used for the fixation of fractures. It is sometimes passed through the maxilla or mandible to provide external points for attachment of upward-supporting devices.

pin

a slender, elongated piece of metal used for securing fixation of parts.

pin bone
the triangular ischial tuber; a term used almost exclusively in cattle.
pin cutter
a sophisticated, surgical version of a boltcutter, usually with multiple scissor joints.
pin drill
a sterilizable drill chuck can be fitted to a surgical power drill and fitted with a surgical bit to match plating screws or orthopedic pins.
intramedullary pin
see internal fixation.
Steinmann pin
a metal rod for the internal fixation of fractures. See also steinmann pin.
pin teat
inverted nipple, seen mostly in sows.
pin toes
toes turned inwards. Called also pigeon toes.
pin vise
a device for attaching to the end of an intramedullary pin to provide a grip for placement in bone. See also chuck.

Patient discussion about pin

Q. Is it possible to have pin worm on directly on the skin of your fore arms? I've had this condition for more than a year. The only thing that makes a difference is something to kill parasites. Nothing works efficiently. I itch all over beside having big sores on my arms and back. I've hade blood test that show that there are no parasites in the blood. So now what do I do? I am constantly digging this out of my skin, and the buggars jump.

A. I'm seeing a dermatologist. They said it wasn't scabies. That's what I thought it was at first. I keep breaking out in new places. The Dr. say's it's dermititous, but I'm seeing something different. Went I first broke out with this I felt crawly in the area I now have the sores.

More discussions about pin
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