fasciitis


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Related to fasciitis: necrotizing fasciitis, nodular fasciitis

fasciitis

 [fas″e-i´tis]
inflammation of a fascia.
necrotizing fasciitis a fulminating group A streptococcal infection beginning with severe or extensive cellulitis that spreads to involve the superficial and deep fascia, producing thrombosis of the subcutaneous vessels and gangrene of the underlying tissues. A cutaneous lesion usually serves as a portal of entry for the infection, but sometimes no such lesion is found.
nodular fasciitis (proliferative fasciitis) a benign, reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in the subcutaneous tissues and commonly associated with the deep fascia.
pseudosarcomatous fasciitis a benign soft tissue tumor occurring subcutaneously and sometimes arising from deep muscle and fascia.

fas·ci·i·tis

(fas'ē-ī'tis, fash-),
1. Inflammation in fascia.
2. Reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in fascia.
Synonym(s): fascitis

fasciitis

/fas·ci·itis/ (fas-e-i´tis) inflammation of a fascia.
eosinophilic fasciitis  inflammation of fasciae of the limbs, with eosinophilia, edema, and swelling, often after strenuous exercise.
necrotizing fasciitis  a gas-forming, fulminating, necrotic infection of the superficial and deep fascia, resulting in thrombosis of the subcutaneous vessels and gangrene of the underlying tissues. It is usually caused by multiple pathogens and is frequently associated with diabetes mellitus.
nodular fasciitis  a benign, reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in the subcutaneous tissues, commonly affecting the deep fascia, usually in young adults.
proliferative fasciitis  a benign reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in subcutaneous tissues, resembling nodular fasciitis but characterized also by basophilic giant cells and occurrence in the skeletal muscles in older adults.
pseudosarcomatous fasciitis  nodular f.

fasciitis

(făsh′ē-ī′tĭs, făs′-)
n.
Inflammation in a fascia, usually as a result of infection or injury.

fasciitis

[fas′ē·ī′tis]
1 an inflammation of the connective tissue that may be caused by streptococcal or other types of infection, an injury, or an autoimmune reaction.
2 an abnormal benign growth (pseudosarcomatous fasciitis) resembling a tumor that develops in the subcutaneous oral tissues, usually in the cheek. Commonly growing rapidly and then regressing, it consists of young fibroblasts and many capillaries and may be mistaken for fibrosarcoma. Also spelled fascitis [fasī′tis] .
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Necrotizing fasciitis

fasciitis

Orthopedics Inflammation of a fascia. See Eosinophilic faciitis, Necrotizing fasciitis, Nodular fasciitis.

fas·ci·i·tis

(fashē-ītis)
1. Inflammation of the fascia.
2. Reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in fascia.

fasciitis

Inflammation of FASCIA. Fasciitis is rare and is sometimes associated with conditions such as ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS or REITER'S SYNDROME. See also NECROTIZING FASCIITIS.

fasciitis

inflammation of fascia
  • plantar fasciitis acute or chronic inflammation of plantar fascia due to formation of microtears in response to repetitive excessive tensile forces (e.g. as in overpronating or cavoid foot); characterized by pain, acute or chronic discomfort in proximal, central or distal part of the plantar fascia, that may radiate into the Achilles tendon; see triple therapy for plantar fasciitis; Table 1

Table 1: Rearfoot pain
Location of painPossible causes
Posterior aspect of heelSever's disease/traction apophysitis
Duck bill fracture of calcaneum
Haglund's deformity
Insertional calcific Achilles tendinosis
Deep retrocalcaneal bursitis
Superficial retrocalcaneal bursitis
Achilles tendinitis
Partial rupture of Achilles tendon
Total rupture of the Achilles tendon
Blisters
Chilblain/perniosis
Inferior (plantar) aspect of heelCalcaneal fracture
Osteoid osteoma
Calcaneal spur
Baxter's neuritis
Sero-negative and sero-positive inflammatory joint disease
Plantar calcaneal bursitis (policeman's heel; stone bruise; subcalcaneal bursitis)
Proximal plantar fasciitis
Proximal foot strain
S1 entrapment neuropathy/radiculopathy
Medial calcaneal nerve entrapment neuropathy
Corn/callosity
Verruca pedis
Medial aspect of the heelDeltoid ligament strain/sprain
Tibialis posterior tendinitis
Tibialis posterior rupture/partial rupture
Flexor hallucis longus tendinitis
Flexor digitorum longus tendinitis
Lateral aspect of the heelLateral collateral ligament strain/sprain
Peroneus longus tendinitis
Peroneus brevis tendinitis
Anterior aspect of ankleOsteochondritis dissecans of the talus
Anterior impingement
Extensor retinaculitis
Periphery of heelHeel fissures
Tinea pedis

fas·ci·i·tis

(fashē-ītis)
1. Inflammation in fascia.
2. Reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in fascia.

fasciitis (fəsī´tis),

n a tumorlike growth occurring in subcutaneous tissues in the oral cavity, usually in the cheek. A benign lesion sometimes mistaken for fibrosarcoma, fasciitis consists of young fibroblasts and numerous capillaries. It grows rapidly and may regress spontaneously.

fasciitis

inflammation of a fascia.

necrotizing fasciitis
a gas-forming, fulminating, necrotic infection of the superficial and deep fascia, resulting in thrombosis of the subcutaneous vessels and gangrene of the underlying tissues. It is usually caused by multiple pathogens.
nodular fasciitis, proliferative fasciitis
see nodular fasciitis.

Patient discussion about fasciitis

Q. Can anyone suggest a treatment for plantar fasciitis, apart from ultrasound, physio, anti-inflammatory agents? My friend has had Plantar Fasciitis for more than 1 year and has persevered with all the ususal treatments above plus lots of rest from weight-bearing and elevation.

A. Padded foot splints, silicone heels insert and special shoes (e.g. arch-supporting shoes) may also help. These are usually sold and fitted by a professional. Exercise is another important measure. Some patients benefit from avoiding walking barefoot or in sleepers but rather using shoes from the first step.

More advanced treatments include steroid-local anesthetics injections, botulinum toxin (similar to botox) injections and surgery.

The prognosis is usually favorable, and most patients achieve relief of the pain.

However, all of the above is just for general knowledge - if you have any specific question, you may want to consult a doctor.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007021.htm

Q. Is there any good source for heel pain relief, besides NSAIDs? My heel pain is most severe at night when I sleep. It's as if the way I position my feet worsen the condition, but I'm at a loss to know how to position my feet. During the day my heels feel so but don't typically bother me.

A. I have found that keeping my feet flexed (the position they are in when standing) helps ease the pain of plantar facitis. I also don't let my feet get cold(wear socks)and keep heavy blankets and quilts off the feet. Placing a box under the covers at the foot of the bed will help keep the blankets up. Do try the exercises recommended on the above web sites. It usually resolves in about 6 months. Best wishes!

More discussions about fasciitis
References in periodicals archive ?
The hallmark sign of plantar fasciitis is a history of post-static dyskinesia: heel pain with the first few steps in the morning and/or after periods of inactivity.
John Crew realized that, because of NeutroPhase's ability to kill microbes and neutralize toxins in solution, the wound cleanser offered a potential advance in the treatment of necrotizing fasciitis.
Known in the medical community as necrotizing fasciitis or NF, the flesh-eating bacteria is often caused by the same bacterium that causes strep throat.
High-load strength training may aid in a quicker reduction in pain and improvements in function for patients with plantar fasciitis.
Histologic analysis established a diagnosis of nodular fasciitis (figure 3).
Crew's innovation was irrigating the spreading wounds of necrotizing fasciitis victims with NeutroPhase, a product from NovaBay Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
If you're healthy, have a strong immune system, and practice good hygiene and proper wound care, your chances of getting necrotizing fasciitis ("flesh-eating" bacteria) are extremely low," (http://www.
Treatment options are limited, and currently there are no simple, low cost effective treatments available for sufferers of plantar fasciitis.
Steroid treatment is often used to treat plantar fasciitis, but it can cause complications.
Dr Loren Miller, who led the research in Los Angeles, said: "Necrotising fasciitis caused by community-associated MRSA is an emerging clinical
Cutaneous manifestations of tuberculosis, including fasciitis, have been described.
reported 60% of patients with plantar fasciitis had improvement of better than 50% after an electro-hydraulic ESWT treatment versus 38% of patients in the control, "sham treatment," group.