fasciculation


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fasciculation

 [fah-sik″u-la´shun]
1. the formation of fascicles.
2. a small local involuntary muscular contraction visible under the skin, representing spontaneous discharge of a number of fibers innervated by a single motor nerve filament.

fas·cic·u·la·tion

(fa-sik'yū-lā'shŭn),
1. An arrangement in the form of fasciculi.
2. Involuntary contractions, or twitchings, of groups (fasciculi) of muscle fibers, a coarser form of muscular contraction than fibrillation.

fasciculation

/fas·cic·u·la·tion/ (fah-sik″u-la´shun)
1. the formation of fascicles.
2. a small local involuntary muscular contraction visible under the skin, representing spontaneous discharge of fibers innervated by a single motor nerve filament.

fasciculation

(fə-sĭk′yə-lā′shən)
n.
1. A form of involuntary muscular contraction that is more intense than fibrillation, consisting of simultaneous twitching of adjacent groups of muscle fibers.
2. An arrangement of fasciculi.

fasciculation

[fasik′yoo͡lā′shən]
Etymology: L, fasciculus, little bundle, atio, process
a localized uncoordinated, uncontrollable twitching of a single muscle group innervated by a single motor nerve fiber or filament that may be palpated and seen under the skin. In anesthesia it refers to muscle twitches that occur with administration of the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine. It also may be symptomatic of a number of disorders, including dietary deficiency, cerebral palsy, fever, neuralgia, polio, rheumatic heart disease, sodium deficiency, tic, or uremia. Fasciculation of the heart muscle is known as fibrillation. fascicular, adj., fasciculate, v.

fas·cic·u·la·tion

(fă-sik'yū-lā'shŭn)
1. An arrangement in the form of fasciculi.
2. Involuntary contractions, or twitchings, of groups (fasciculi) of muscle fibers, a coarser form of muscular contraction than fibrillation.

fasciculation

Brief, involuntary contraction of a small group of muscle fibres, causing visible twitching under the skin. In most cases fasciculation is of no importance but persistent severe fasciculation may imply nerve disease and should be reported.

fasciculation

involuntary contraction or spasmodic twitching of muscle fibres, coarser than fibrillation

fasciculation (f·siˈ·kyu·lāˑ·shn),

n localized twitching of a muscle group. Most often idiopathic and benign but also occurs during administration of anesthesia; may be symptomatic of dietary deficiency, fever, cerebral palsy, polio, heart disease, uremia, and several other disorders.

fasciculation

1. the formation of fascicles.
2. a small local involuntary muscular contraction visible under the skin, representing spontaneous discharge of a number of fibers innervated by a single motor nerve filament.

Patient discussion about fasciculation

Q. Female 57old has fasciculation.Started 3 months ago as a twiching jumping beneath the skin mainly legs & It started with the legs(lower back parts),more so in the right side.Lately also in the hand(mainly arms ,more apparent on the right).There is also a sense of tensed muscles(sometimes painful because of prolonged tension),"pins &needles"and often a sense like a low electric current going through the limbs(mainly legs,sometimes arms).Also sometimes they tend to feel a little numbness and "fall asleep" real easy.She first noticed it only in the morning when she woke up,both legs lower part,back side.About 2 weeks ago it started not to go away,but stay with her all day and night.When she walks it is a lot less noticeable. All the blood tests,vitamins(D,B12,Mg,Na)are OK.TSH(Thyroid)&CK are OK too.Creatine, Calcium,OK

A. Sounds like you have peripheral neuropathy. Have you tried to consult a dorctor (e.g. a neurologist)?

It's a disease of the nerves in the periphery of your body. It may reulst form many things, including diabetes (was your blood glucose measured?) and other diseases.

You can read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000593.htm

More discussions about fasciculation
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common clinical manifestation was respiratory distress (50%) followed by neck muscle weakness/ fasciculations (44%), miosis (40%) and diaphoresis (30%).
We randomized 30 patients in three groups: a group of 10 patients with symptomatic fasciculation and anxiety, second group of 10 patients fasciculations associated with sensory symptoms or muscle weakness and were diagnosed with neuropathy or SLA (3 patients with SLA and 7 patients with neuropathy) and a third group of 10 patients with fasciculations associated with cramps (cramp-fasciculation-syndrome).
As fasciculation potentials in ALS and benign fasciculation syndrome are indistinguishable on grounds of waveform parameters (3) and there is not a reliable biological marker of the disease, a minimum follow-up of 6 months is required before setting a prognosis.
The patient presented to our clinic with LMN signs in two regions evidenced by dysarthria and the weakness and fasciculation in the upper limb as well as UMN signs in two regions displayed by pathological reflexes in the upper and lower limb.
Permissive or modulatory signals provide neither direction nor position, but instead allow for processes such as axon fasciculation or adhesion to the substrate, which can indirectly aid in the path-finding process.
These defects include decreases in axon fasciculation and invasion of some axons into the caudal somite, which they would normally avoid.
elegans, where it is required for correct axon bundle fasciculation (7); vertebrate Lhx1 is similarly expressed in motor neurons of the spinal cord.
Electromyography showed evidence of neurogenic discharge with a great amount of fasciculation and high amplitude of motor unit potentials.
However, there were no signs of intrinsic muscle atrophy or fasciculation.