farm

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farm

agricultural enterprise based on land use.

farm animal
animals used for the production of human and animal food and feed, fiber, skin and hide and, to the extent that they are used in farm work, bullocks and horses used in the hauling of freight and for transport.
farm chemical
includes fertilizers, insectides, herbicides, medicines, bird repellents, poison baits: a common source of poisoning for farm animals.
dry farm
a farm dependent on rainfall as its water resource—no irrigation is available.
irrigation farm
a farm with a significant part of its area under irrigation.
pasture farm
a farm whose principal resource is pasture for grazing animals.
farm profile
a description of the resources and practices on a farm drawn up so that an assessor can estimate the financial viability and potential of the unit.
farm visits
see veterinary farm visits.
References in periodicals archive ?
Impact of Own Chemicals on Water Quality: This was measured by asking the respondent to indicate the consequences of using farm chemicals on his/her farm on water quality.
The loss of land to urban development is of greater concern to older Canadians, while the use of farm chemicals is more important to those in the 18-34 age group.
Research focused on water wells used for household consumption revealed that human health was at risk from surface application of farm chemicals.
However, among those 40-59 years of age, both the number of micronuclei/1,000 binucleate cells and the percentage of cells with micronuclei were statistically significantly elevated among those who lived within a mile of the Farm Chemicals site compared to those who lived farther away (number of micronuclei/1000 binucleate cells [is less than] 1 mile of Farm Chemicals: 21, n = 25; [is greater than] 1 mile from Farm Chemicals: 16, n = 92, p = 0.
But the technology gives growers an unparalleled degree of precision in delivering water and fertilizer - or other farm chemicals - to plants.
However, soil erosion remains a significant environmental problem primarily due to farm chemicals being transported to surface waterways and to under ground supplies.
Nonpoint pollution comes from diffuse, largely unidentifiable sources, such as rainwater runoff of farm chemicals.
Studies by Johnson and colleagues in Tifton's Nematodes, Weeds, and Crops Research Unit focus on the environmental fate of pesticides and other farm chemicals.
Wetlands provide habitat for wildlife, serve as storage areas for excess flood water, act as traps for farm chemicals, contribute to recharge of groundwater aquifers, reduce sediment load of surface water, provide recreational opportunities, maintain the biodiversity of ecosystems, contribute to the aesthetic quality of the physical environment, and reduce soil loss (Dahl and Johnson 1991; Kusler and Brooks 1987; Mitch and Gosselink 1986; Page 1987; USEPA 1993).