famine


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famine

(făm′ĭn)
n.
1. A drastic, wide-reaching food shortage.
2. Severe hunger; starvation.
A catastrophic food shortage due to lack of food or difficulties in food distribution, affecting large numbers of people due to climatic, environmental, socio-economic reasons or extreme political conditions such as tyrannical government or warfare

famine

Pronounced scarcity of food in a broad geographical area, causing widespread starvation, disease, and/or death in a population.
References in periodicals archive ?
He takes as his harrowing sample 58 major famines between 1870 and 2010 and, in a distressing number of cases, political beastliness carries much of the responsibility for tragedy.
There is concern that famine could exist in many parts of the RSS.
New publications have highlighted the complexities inherent in studying famine as a calamitous event with intersecting biological and social factors (e.
In February, South Sudan declared two counties in Unity State to be in famine.
The origins of such prejudice are briefly but suitably supported by reference to primary sources that underscore the racist attitudes of the British towards those defined as "other" to the Anglo-Saxon; and none more so than the Irish victims of Famine.
At the opening of a conference on the Famine in 1995, Irish president Mary Robinson spoke of this "event which more than any other shaped us as a people.
We now have the capacity to take measures to avoid famine.
Indeed, in the first edition of the Essay on Population he ventured that "in some states" of Europe "an absolute famine has never been known" (Malthus 1798, ch.
Among those who responded with unstinted generosity were the Sultan of Turkey, Pope Pius IX, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, "fallen women" in London, and many others, which provides clear support for the argument that the Irish famine was indeed the first global humanitarian crisis.
Kathrin Moeller used a case study of the city of Halle to showcase the potential of famine research for economic history.
Pauline Lomax, originally from Belfast, is bringing the event back after a six-year break along with former members of Wales Famine Forum.
It marked the 81st anniversary of the forced famine which killed seven to 10 million people.