family of origin


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family

 [fam´ĭ-le]
1. a group of people related by blood or marriage or a strong common bond, such as those descended from a common ancestor, or a husband, wife, and their children.
2. a taxonomic category below an order and above a genus.
blended family a family unit composed of a married couple and their offspring including some from previous marriages.
dysfunctional family one in which adult caregivers are unable to consistently fulfill their family responsibilities.
extended family a nuclear family and their close relatives, such as the children's grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
nuclear family a family consisting of a two-generation relationship of parents and children, living together and more or less isolated from their extended family.
nuclear dyad family a husband and wife with no children.
family of origin the family in which a person grew up.
family processes the psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual functions and relationships within the family unit; for nursing diagnoses, see under process.
single-parent family a lone parent and offspring living together as a family unit.
skewed family a family in which one spouse is severely dysfunctional and the other spouse assumes an acquiescent, peacemaking stance to maintain equilibrium.
family (omaha) in the omaha system, a problem modifier defined as a social unit or related group of individuals who live together and who experience a health-related problem.

family of origin

the family into which a person is born.

family of origin

The family into which one is born and to whom one is related.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, it fills the gaps in the literature noted by Whiston and Keller (2004) by providing details about the effects of family of origin on adults as well as adding to the literature on adults who do not attend college.
He also seems to have reproduced the participatory family culture from his family of origin, and emphasizes the importance of everyone, not only parents but also children, participating in the work in the home.
All 260 participants completed the scales assessing general functional and dysfunctional perfectionism, family of origin system qualities and social desirability.
Most children visited their family of origin during school holidays: 68 per cent visited their mother, 10.
More than two-thirds of family of origin caregivers were the primary caregiver to that person.
Pearson correlation analysis was performed to examine the relationship between variables such as the level of a client's distress and a student's demographic characteristics, such as the current or past economic status of the family of origin, self-need for help to supply basic necessities at present and in the future, and a student's willingness to provide basic needs to clients (see Table 1).
Among the details that emerge about Zimbalist's life that beg for expansion and analysis are his abandonment of his Jewish heritage for Christianity, and his neglect of his family of origin.
The narrative of the great flood is similarly expanded into a multi-generational family story in which Noah is portrayed as an albino with a gift for philosophy who is excluded from his family of origin, only to, in turn, keep his relatives from boarding the ark.
In fact, most participants clearly state that they consider their adoptive parent(s) to be their 'real parents', but they are curious about their family of origin.
Also, take into account your family of origin and your family of choice, since they are both important in how you see yourself as an individual.
Recognition of these intergenerational associations leads naturally to questions about the proximate effects of the early family environment, and particularly about those effects that are likely to mediate associations between experiences in the family of origin and later marital outcomes.
Despite my frustrations, I'll never "leave" the church, any more than I can leave my family of origin.

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