family history


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family history

an essential part of a patient's medical history in which he or she is asked about the health of members of the immediate family in a series of specific questions to discover any disorders to which the patient may be particularly vulnerable, such as "Has anyone in your family had tuberculosis? Diabetes mellitus? Breast cancer?" Hereditary and familial diseases are especially noted. The age and health of each person, age at death, and causes of death are charted. Often a genogram is developed for pictoral documentation. The family health history is obtained from the patient or family in the initial interview and becomes a part of the permanent record. Other questions, such as those concerning the age, sex, relationships of others in the household, and marital history of the patient, may also be asked if the information has not already been secured.

family history

Medspeak-UK
History of a condition in at least one of the following family members: parent, sibling, grandparent, great-grandparent, aunt, uncle, nephew, niece or cousin; as in “The patient has a family history of breast cancer on her mother’s side”.

Medspeak-US
A summary of diseases (e.g., cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and others) present in immediate blood relatives, which may be linked to heritable DNA mutations.  

Psychiatry
Presence of mental disorder or occurrence of suicide in parents, siblings, etc.

family history

A summary of diseases present in immediate blood relatives–eg cardiovascular disease, DM, malignancy, cancer, etc, which may be linked to hereditable DNA mutations. Cf Social history.

fam·i·ly his·to·ry

(fam'i-lē his'tŏr-ē)
A written documentation made after questioning the patient about the presence or absence of diseases or conditions in his or her family that might have an effect on the health of the patient (e.g., coronary disease, alcoholism, diabetes mellitus).

fam·i·ly his·to·ry

(fam'i-lē his'tŏr-ē)
A written documentation made after questioning the patient about the presence or absence of diseases or conditions that might have an effect on the health of the patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Consider, for example, the inclusion of family history in assessment of coronary artery disease risk or likelihood of carrying a mutation in one of the BRCA genes.
It's great to see family history continuing to be popular, and the extensive resources we have will help residents in their search to find out more about their ancestors.
In the 40 - 49 age group, we found a significant rate of breast cancer and similar rates of invasive disease in women with and without family history," Dr.
The researchers concluded that clinically relevant family history changes substantially during early and middle adulthood, particularly with regard to colorectal and breast cancer, for which the percentage recommended for high-risk screening increases 1.
Ache son, MD, MS, of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, cautioned that "it is plausible but still unknown whether family history increases the likelihood that breast cancers, prostate cancers or colon adenomas found by screening are clinically significant.
The American Cancer Society's most recent guidelines issued in 2007 recommend annual screening MRI in addition to mammography for women in two high-risk groups: those with genetic mutation such as the BRCA gene or first-degree relatives with the gene and those with greater than or equal to 20%-25% lifetime risk, based on family history The guidelines concluded that there was insufficient evidence to recommend for or against breast MRI in patients with only a personal history of the disease but no genetic or family risk.
It suggests they may be better off selecting people with more serious illness or, better still, collecting family history information directly.
5) Enrol on a family history course: It is always worth joining a family history course.
The forum - part of National Archives Awareness Month - will open with an introduction to family history that will be invaluable for people wishing to start tracing their family tree.
This is family history on the grand scale and includes one Verney who betrayed his wife, country and religion to leave for Morocco, piracy and the joys of Mohammedism.
Noeline Kyle, Writing Family History Made Very Easy: a beginner's guide, Allen and Unwin, Sydney, 2007, viii + 312 pages; ISBN 978 1 74175 062 1.

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