family disorganization

family disorganization

a breakdown of a family system. It may be associated with parental overburdening or loss of significant others who served as role models for children or support systems for family members. Family disorganization can contribute to the loss of social controls that families usually impose on their members.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In The Bell Curve, Herrnstein and Murray predicted that politicians and intellectuals would eventually come to realize that a dull-witted underclass is biologically condemned to a subculture of crime, addiction, family disorganization, child abuse, and unavailability for work.
Adelekan, Ndom and Imouokhome (1996) identified higher levels of drug use to be associated with parental use, family background, parental conflict, single parentage, family disorganization, and social class and peer group.
Family disorganization was measured by four factors, such as, parental relation, parental dispute, cause of dispute, and parental separation.
In an article for Social Work, Seaton Manning (1960), the Executive Director of the Bay Area Urban League, concluded that among low-income African-Americans, "Personal and family disorganization is common" (Manning, 1960, p.
Thomas, "Catholic Family Disorganization," in Ernest Burgess and Donald J.
As a group, the 30 homicidal adolescents were seen as coming from homes marked by family disorganization, marital conflict, economic insecurity, and parental brutality.
1976) investigation, comparing and contrasting 30 adolescent murderers, provides objective evidence of family disorganization, marital conflict, parental brutality, and parental alcoholism in adolescents who kill.
Family crisis denotes family disorganization and a demand for basic changes in the family patterns of functioning in order to restore stability, order, and a sense of coherence.