falsificationism


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falsificationism

view, propounded by the philosopher Popper and coming to prominence in the English-speaking world in the 1950s, that the hallmark of good science is to challenge every hypothesis or theory ('conjecture') by actively identifying and testing predictions which follow only from it, not from competing theories, one criterion of a good theory being that it gives rise to many such explicit, unique and so 'vulnerable' predictions. Failure of the prediction will then falsify or refute the theory; on the other hand, success of a prediction can be regarded as corroborating evidence but not as irrefutable proof, which is never possible. aka refutationism ; contrasts with verificationism.
References in periodicals archive ?
2) These include Millian deductivism, logical empiricism, falsificationism, rationalist formalism, fictionalist predictivism, Bayesian empiricism and transcendental deductivism.
Xenophanes, a critical rationalist and realist, pioneered philosophy of religion and epistemology, but his method was not confined to falsificationism, and appears compatible with inductivism and abductionism.
Falsificationism is particularly explored in-depth including its limits, and several philosophical viewpoints on the nature of theories and the nature of scientific knowledge are presented.
social psychology, socio-biology, and ethology), sociology of knowledge, and history has resolved (or dissolved) the classical problems of epistemology and made irrelevant Popper's falsificationism (both as a theory in classical epistemology and as a theory of science)?
Rao then considers Karl Popper's falsificationism and Imre Lakatos's notion of research programmes, and he outlines problems with each position.
In the distorting mirror of naive falsificationism, new theories which replace old refuted ones, are themselves born unrefuted.
contemporary philosophers view falsificationism as inadequate to account
In the view of some, these developments in philosophy led naturally not so much to Popper's (1959, 1962, 1972) falsificationism, his "conjectures and refutations" emphasizing only selection against, but rather to "conjectures" and changes in relative frequencies by means of any, or all of, competition, conflict, and cooperation--that is to evolutionary theories of scientific change, such as those of Toulmin (1972) and Hull (1988).
The methodology of science carries this innocent chat as two aspects of falsificationism, namely, naive and sophisticated.
Widely held views about how academic criticism should be conducted, as set forth by willful proponents of skepticism, falsificationism, or deconstructionism, are subtly at variance with the realities of spontaneous human inquiry as disclosed by sustained self-appropriation.
The limitations of both naive inductivism and naive falsificationism highlights the complexity of appraising theories.