falsetto


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

fal·set·to

(fawl-set'tō),
Descriptive of phonation at an unnaturally high frequency.
[It., fr. falso, false, + -etto, dim. suffix]

fal·set·to

(fawl-set'tō)
High-pitched voice produced by vibration of the anterior third of the vocal folds while the posterior folds are tightly adducted.
See also: voice
[It., fr. falso, false, + -etto, dim. suffix]
References in periodicals archive ?
When I hired Michele, I knew that her extensive expertise and demonstrated success in growing brands and driving breakthrough innovation was a perfect match for a rapidly growing food company like thinkThin," said Falsetto.
When he - sorry, the Falsetto Socks - got hit with a movie title they didn't recognise, it merely ramped up the laughter rippling through the hall.
But the biggest surprise of the night was Higgs' falsetto which flopped and for the main part was drowned out by uneven sound.
The Scottish Falsetto Sock Puppet Theatre are the comedy double act - their performance has to be seen to be believed
To heighten the tension of the 10 originals, Rice also intersperses full-throated vocal passages with flashes of piercing falsetto voice.
A particularly interesting aspect of the book is Miller's explanation of old terminology, such as covering, placement and falsetto, offering both traditional and modern interpretations.
The group blends dreamy pop with frantic time signatures, metal riffs, and falsetto vocals, leaving critics and listeners fumbling for a back catalog of adjectives and "sounds likes" to describe their music.
Juanita shares her joy and pain with Socrates "Scooter" Morrison, a neighborhood boy, who is also suffering from the locals' taunts because of his falsetto voice and wiggling hips.
The man in my mouth who sings falsetto has nothing to do with the woman who flashes a blur of peter & kootch behind a tolled curtain.
They began in stately fashion and grew to the falsetto singing of an elderly blind man, who was also one of the percussionists.
A falsetto loverman (like Motown's Eddie Kendricks and Smokey Robinson) is allowed to cry and wail about his feelings, and a throaty belter (like Mavis Staples, Gladys Knight, or Tina Turner) can be bossy or aggressive; in both cases, the singer teases his or her audience by adopting the "voice" of the opposite sex.