failure-to-rescue

failure-to-rescue

(făl′yĕr-too-rĕs′kū),

FTR

Loss of life among hospitalized patients resulting from inadequate recognition and treatment of life-threatening complications. FTR is correlated with high ratios of patients to nurses and with psychological variables (e.g., burnout). It has been used, along with complication rates of surgery and other criteria, as an indicator of the quality of hospital care.
References in periodicals archive ?
It helps to eliminate failure-to-rescue events, enables central monitoring of multiple patients and sites, and allows for the aggregation and analysis of local, regional and global site data to detect patterns, trends and outcomes.
In a retrospective study, Shever (2011) linked the level of nursing surveillance to failure-to-rescue incidents.
Hospitals employing higher percentages of BSN-prepared nurses have shown an associated decrease in morbidity, mortality, and failure-to-rescue rates (Aiken et al.
Nurse monitoring and ongoing surveillance during the first 24-hour period after surgery (Wadlund, 2006; Zeitz & McCutcheon, 2006) can prevent a failure-to-rescue event from occurring (Clarke & Aiken, 2003).
Conversely, those with poor clinical reasoning skills often fail to detect impending patient deterioration resulting in a failure-to-rescue.
Here, we examine in-hospital and 30-day mortality; in-hospital and 30-day complications; in-hospital and 30-day failure-to-rescue (Silber et al.
the higher the percentage of BSN nurses the lower the odds on patient deaths and failure-to-rescue (p.
A 2002 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that in hospitals with a high patient-to-nurse ratio, surgical patients experience higher risk-adjusted 30-day mortality and failure-to-rescue rates, and nurses are more likely to experience burnout and job dissatisfaction.
For every 10% increase in RNs there is a 27% decrease in failure-to-rescue and we have wards in NSW where the percentage of RNs is already below 50%.
The patients studied did not include all patients but were limited to risk-adjusted patient mortality and failure-to-rescue within 30 days of admission.
What remains unknown is whether racial disparities also extend to major complications and failure-to-rescue (death after a major complication) (Silber et al.