factitious disorder


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to factitious disorder: conversion disorder, somatoform disorder, illness anxiety disorder, Factitious Disorder by Proxy

factitious

 [fak-tish´us]
artificial; not natural.
factitious disorder a mental disorder characterized by repeated, knowing simulation of physical or psychological symptoms for no apparent purpose other than obtaining treatment. Unlike malingering there is no recognizable motive for feigning illness. It is subtyped on the basis of whether the predominant signs and symptoms are physical (munchausen syndrome), psychological, or both. See also ganser syndrome.
factitious disorder by proxy a form of factitious disorder in which one person (usually a mother) intentionally fabricates or induces signs and symptoms of one or more physical (munchausen syndrome by proxy) or psychological disorders in another person under their care (usually a child) and subjects that person to needless and sometimes dangerous or disfiguring diagnostic procedures or treatment, without any external incentives for the behavior existing.

fac·ti·tious dis·or·der

a mental disorder in which the patient intentionally produces symptoms of illness or feigns illness for psychological reasons rather than for environmental goals.

factitious disorder

[faktish′əs]
a DSM-IV diagnosis marked by disease symptoms caused by deliberate efforts of a person to gain attention. Such actions may be repeated, even when the individual is aware of the hazards involved. See also Münchausen's syndrome.
The repeated simulation of severe organic disease, leading to numerous medical and/or surgical consultations, hospitalisations and unnecessary operations. This pseudodisease affects individuals who create bizarre lesions or fabricate symptoms to enjoy the perceived benefits of hospitalisation, as well as the attention and sympathy of others
Statistics Male:female ratio, 1:2; 74% develop the condition by age 24; the average patient is diagnosed by age 32.

fac·ti·tious dis·or·der

(fak-tish'ŭs dis-ōr'dĕr)
A mental condition in which the patient intentionally induces symptoms of illness for psychological reasons.

Factitious disorder

A disorder in which the physical or psychological symptoms are under voluntary control.
Mentioned in: Munchausen Syndrome

fac·ti·tious dis·or·der

(fak-tish'ŭs dis-ōr'dĕr)
A mental condition in which the patient intentionally induces symptoms of illness for psychological reasons.
References in periodicals archive ?
Factitious disorder is described in the DSM-IV-TR as an intentional production or feigning of physical or psychological signs or symptoms in which the motivation for the behavior is to assume the sick role.
FACTITIOUS DIARRHEA DUE TO SURREPTITIOUS INGESTION OF LAXATIVES: A PROTOTYPE OF FACTITIOUS DISORDERS
Patients with factitious disorder may receive unnecessary drugs, cervical cerclage, and cesarean sections by unsuspecting physicians.
We considered that he consciously simulated the symptoms wandering from place to place (malingerer), so that we excluded the diagnoses of conversion disorder and supposed that the co-morbid diagnosis was factitious disorder.
Malingering and factitious disorder both involve a conscious, voluntary control of the symptoms.
Factitious disorder should be kept in mind in the treatment of patients exhibiting symptoms of pulmonary hemoptysis with normal physical and laboratory data.
The presence of a factitious disorder must be distinguished from patient noncompliance.
Concurrent factitious disorder and factitious disorder by proxy.
Malingering may be comorbid with alcohol and substance abuse, factitious disorder such as Ganser and Munchausen Syndromes, conversion disorder and especially antisocial personality disorder (13).
Munchausen by Proxy and Factitious Disorder Imposed on Another Why do you need to know about Munchausen by Proxy?
Diagnoses included disorders primarily diagnosed in children, cognitive disorders, mental disorders due to a general medical condition, substance-related disorders, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, somatoform disorders, factitious disorders, sexual/ gender identity disorders, eating disorders, sleep disorders, impulse-control disorders, adjustment disorders, and personality disorders.
Some psychiatric disorders like factitious disorders with physical symptoms may be misdiagnosed such as reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome.