facial palsy


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Related to facial palsy: Facial paralysis

palsy

 [pawl´ze]
Bell's palsy see bell's palsy.
birth palsy birth paralysis.
cerebral palsy see cerebral palsy.
crossed leg palsy palsy of the fibular nerve, caused by sitting with one leg crossed over the other.
Erb's palsy (Erb-Duchenne palsy) Erb-Duchenne paralysis.
facial palsy Bell's palsy.
shaking palsy Parkinson's disease.

fa·cial pa·ral·y·sis

paresis or paralysis of the facial muscles, usually unilateral, due to either a lesion involving either the nucleus or the facial nerve peripheral to the nucleus (peripheral facial paralysis) or a supranuclear lesion in the cerebrum or upper brainstem (central facial paralysis); with the latter, facial weakness is usually partial and the upper portion of the face is relatively spared, because of bilateral cortical connections.

facial palsy

Etymology: L, facies, face; Gk, paralyein, to be palsied
a loss of motor nerve function in the muscles of the face. See also Bell's palsy.

Bell’s palsy

Acute peripheral paralysis of the face due to a herpes simplex immune-mediated condition, often characterised by severe pain arising in the trigeminal nerve, the chief sensory nerve of the face, which arises in cranial nerve VII.
 
Clinical findings
Abrupt onset, drooping mouth, unblinking eye, twisted nose, uneven smile, distorted expressions; paralysis hits maximum in 1 to 14 days; retroauricular pain, facial numbness, epiphora, parageusia, decreased tearing, hyperacusis, hypoesthesia or dysesthesia of cranial nerves (CN V and IX), motor paresis of CN IX and X, papillitis of tongue.
 
Epidemiology
Risk of Bell’s palsy increases with age; age 10 to 19, 2:1 female:male ratio; age 40, 3:2 men:women ratio; pregnant women have 3.3 times increased risk than nonpregnant; DM = 4.5 times increased risk of BP; 10% of patients have positive family Hx of BP.
 
DiffDx, unilateral
Tumours or masses, otitis media, sarcoid, Lyme disease, skull fracture, facial injury.
 
DiffDx, bilateral
Guillain-Barré syndrome, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, Möbius syndrome, motor neuron disease, myasthenia gravis.

Aetiology
Trauma, Bell’s palsy, stroke, parotid tumours, intracranial tumours.
 
Management
Microvascular and micro-neurosurgical tissue transfers allow restoration of functional, unconscious, symmetrical facial movements; acyclovir; steroids (uncertain efficacy); artificial tears; neuromuscular retraining—e.g., mirror/visual feedback, biofeedback or electromyography feedback.
 
Prognosis
60 to 80% recover, especially if incomplete paralysis, and patient is young.

facial palsy

Bell's palsy, cranial mononeuropathy VII, facial mononeuropathy, facial nerve palsy, facial neuralgia Neurology Acute peripheral paralysis of the face due to a herpes simplex immune-mediated condition often characterized by severe pain in the trigeminal nerve Epidemiology Risk of FP ↑ with age; age 10 to 19, 2:1, ♀:♂; age 40, 3:2, ♂:♀; pregnant ♀ have 3.3 times ↑ risk than nonpregnant; DM = 4.5 times↑ risk of FP; 10% of Pts have positive family Hx of FP Pathogenesis FP is due to reactivation of the virus leading to replication of virus within the ganglion cells; the virus travels down the axons, inducing inflammation Clinical Abrupt onset, drooping mouth, unblinking eye, twisted nose, uneven smile, distorted expressions; paralysis hits maximum in 1 to 14 days; retroauricular pain, facial numbness, epiphora, parageusia, ↓ tearing, hyperacusis, hypoesthesia or dysesthesia of cranial nerves–CN V and IX, motor paresis of CN IX and X, papillitis of tongue DiffDx, unilateral Tumors or masses, otitis media, sarcoid, Lyme disease, skull fracture, facial injury DiffDx, bilateral Guillain-Barré syndrome, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, Möbius syndrome, motor neuron disease, myasthenia gravis Etiology Trauma, Bell's palsy, stroke, parotid tumors, intracranial tumors Management Microvascular and micro-neurosurgical tissue transfers allow restoration of functional, unconscious, symmetrical facial movements, acyclovir, steroids–efficacy is uncertain, artificial tears, neuromuscular retraining–eg, mirror/visual feedback, biofeedback or electromyography feedback Prognosis 60 to 80% recover, especially if incomplete paralysis, and Pt is young

fa·cial pa·ral·y·sis

(fā'shăl păr-al'i-sis)
Paresis or paralysis of the facial muscles, usually unilateral, due to either a lesion involving the nucleus of the facial nerve or a supranuclear lesion in the cerebrum or upper brainstem.
See also: Bell palsy
Synonym(s): facial palsy, facioplegia, prosopoplegia.

facial palsy

See BELL'S PALSY.

fa·cial pa·ral·y·sis

(fā'shăl păr-al'i-sis)
Paresis or paralysis of facial muscles, usually unilateral, due to either a lesion involving either nucleus or facial nerve peripheral to nucleus or supranuclear lesion in cerebrum or upper brainstem. Causes include Bell palsy, stroke, brain tumor, sarcoidosis, Lyme disease, infection, and birth trauma in affected newborns.
Synonym(s): facial palsy, facioplegia.
References in periodicals archive ?
New methods and treatments for facial palsy which are age appropriate will harness her enthusiasm and give her the best possible chance of a full recovery in the future.
There are no reports in literature about bilateral facial palsy in association with the use of chloroquine.
Corticosteroids have long been the mainstay of treatment and are the drugs of choice in facial palsy.
Family days have been introduced by the charity, as a way of ensuring that children affected by facial palsy, their siblings and parents, are able to have a fun, relaxed day and meet others in the same position.
Deputy chief executive of charity Facial Palsy UK Karen Johnson said the condition was rare and "isolating".
The form states: "The claimant [Caitlin] currently still has a right-sided facial palsy and has suffered psychologically and has been bullied at school because of her disfigurement.
The form states: "The claimant [Caitlin] currently still has a right sided facial palsy and has suffered psychologically and has been bullied at school because of her disfigurement.
Megan Telfer, who suffers from facial palsy, had just woken up after an eye operation when she heard jingling bells, and she took her Rudolph teddy to meet Santa too.
5) During that time, nerve foramens can be narrowed by the increased bone mass, causing blindness, deafness, and facial palsy.
Due to Tobias's treatment he has become unable to walk, talk, hear out of his right ear and has developed a right sided weakness in his body as well as left sided facial palsy.