facial muscle


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Related to facial muscle: masseter, Orbicularis oris

facial muscle

one of numerous muscles of the face that seldom remains distinct over its entire length because of a tendency to merge with a neighboring muscle at its termination or its attachment. The five groups of facial muscles are the muscles of the scalp, the extrinsic muscles of the ear, the muscles of the nose, the muscles of the eyelid, and the muscles of the mouth. The platysma is one of the facial group but is classified among the muscles of the neck. Also called muscle of expression.
References in periodicals archive ?
He would watch the scrap of tissue grow and change from a mass of anonymous cells into well-defined facial muscles.
A computer game which helps improve facial muscles is to launch in the UK.
He expects Botox to be widely marketed to doctors, even those with little knowledge of facial muscles.
Washington, Aug 8 (ANI): Just reading some words can activate a person's facial muscles and make him or her smile unknowingly, reveals a new study.
2 with a new Facial Animator tool that generates animated human facial muscle movements directly from speech or text input using high level animation controls.
Descriptions of the young womens' facial muscle actions, such as pulling the brows together and wrinkling the nose, were made by two observers experienced in using a facial measurement technique developed by Ekman and his co-workers.
The study also confirmed that dosing should be adjusted according to a person's facial muscle mass.
It comprises facial muscle toning and moisture infusion to help reduce fine lines and wrinkles, tone and lift sagging muscles, reduce open pores and improve the colour and texture of the skin.
It apparently detects thoughts through 15 sensors which pick up facial muscle movements - like a grimace or a smile, blinking and lifting an eyebrow - and electrical activity in the brain.
During that time FCI used the esthetics market as a development laboratory in which the Facial- Flex(R) device was functionally tested by a broad cross section of people experiencing facial muscle laxity, but without oral-motor impairment.
While the primary goal of this work was to solve the engineering problem of how to approximate the appearance of human facial muscle movements with motors, the researchers say this kind of work could also lead to insights into how humans learn and develop facial expressions.
Dunn is most known for the breakthrough medical anatomical discovery of Sphenomandibularis, a facial muscle that is likely connected to headaches and facial pains.