facial muscle


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Related to facial muscle: masseter, Orbicularis oris

facial muscle

one of numerous muscles of the face that seldom remains distinct over its entire length because of a tendency to merge with a neighboring muscle at its termination or its attachment. The five groups of facial muscles are the muscles of the scalp, the extrinsic muscles of the ear, the muscles of the nose, the muscles of the eyelid, and the muscles of the mouth. The platysma is one of the facial group but is classified among the muscles of the neck. Also called muscle of expression.
References in periodicals archive ?
15 It is the third most common muscular dystrophy involving the facial muscles resulting in a characteristic clinical appearance that may contribute to reduced facial wrinkles.
This case highlights one of the rare conditions causing neuropathy, presenting mainly with facial muscle wasting.
Electrical stimulation of the facial muscles not only preserves the muscle bulk in complete paralysis, but also has a psychological benefit.
A positive correlation between RPE and frowning expression involving EMG evidence of facial muscle activity during leg extension and constant workload cycling exercises has been shown (de Morree and Marcora, 2010; 2012).
In the resulting 5,000 images, they painstakingly tagged prominent landmarks for facial muscles, such as the corners of the mouth or the outer edge of the eyebrow.
A computer game which helps improve facial muscles is to launch in the UK.
He would watch the scrap of tissue grow and change from a mass of anonymous cells into well-defined facial muscles.
Then again considering Spence only ever uses one facial muscle this is perhaps not so bad.
The position and arrangement of the cuts suggest that a facial muscle was sliced off in order to remove the lower jaw from the rest of the skull, Pickering says.
Whatever this gene is, it has a significant effect on brain development and is probably involved in the coordination of facial muscle movements needed for effective speech," holds study coauthor Faraneh Vargha-Khadem, a psychologist at the Wolfson Centre in London.
Elie Levine believes the actress "received Botox to her face and likely her neck," which paralyzes facial muscle and causes one to compensate and "recruit other muscles that are not regularly used.
Playing the bitter waitress who, through a lot of neck cracking and facial muscle strength, manages to turn her perpetual scowl into a strained smile in the presence of customers, Ubach creates a character we've all seen, someone who'd rather be anywhere but waiting.