facial droop

facial droop

Neurology A unilateral sagging of the face, which usually indicates paralysis of facial muscles due to trauma, infection or tumor removal near or at the facial nerve. See Facial palsy.

facial droop

Loss of motor control on one side of the face, resulting in weakness of the muscles on one side of the mouth, with an inability to smile symmetrically. A common finding in acute stroke and Bell's palsy. In stroke, the weakness is limited to the lower half of the face.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another case involved a 75-year-old man with progressive right facial droop, who had experienced neurologic symptoms on the right side of his face, including numbness, tingling, oculomotor dysfunction, and radiating pain.
Symptoms included dysarthria, left lower facial droop, flaccid left arm, weak left leg, and left hemineglect.
Typical symptoms of a stroke include weakness on one side, slurred speech or other difficulties forming the right words, facial droop, or asymmetrical smile.
A 71 year-old female with a past medical history significant for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and strokes, presented initially to the stroke service with a sudden onset of right facial droop, right-sided weakness, dysarthria, and seizures that had gotten progressively worse for six weeks
There was significant right ptosis, right-sided facial droop, and decreased sensation to pain, touch, and temperature in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the right trigeminal nerve.
After the seizure, patient was found to have on examination, left facial droop, left upper extremity power of 3/5, left lower extremity power of 3/5, sensory neglect, dysarthria, perservation, and confusion.
He denied weight loss, fever, tinnitus, subjective hearing loss, unilateral facial droop, or weakness.
It involves checking a person's face for signs of weakness or facial droop, their arms for weakness, and their speech for slurring, or difficulty speaking.
It consists of eight elements, including assessment of orientation, ability to follow commands, motor strength, and assessment for facial droop (Figure 2).
For example, in the case of a patient with Bells palsy, the signs can be ptosis, a facial droop with pain caused by the swelling or damage to the trigeminal nerve, headaches, or the inability to make facial expressions due to a paralysis of the facial nerve.
The symptoms did worsen-medics suggested Chicken Pox and Scarlet Fever, and then the facial droop was joined with a head tilt and a lazy eye.
G, age 59, experiences sudden left-sided weakness and facial droop, but a medical workup does not reveal an organic cause.