facial bone


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facial bone

n.
Any of the bones surrounding the mouth and nose and contributing to the eye sockets, including the upper jawbones, the zygomatic, nasal, lacrimal, and palatine bones, lower jawbone, and hyoid bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The latter occurs more commonly in the tumors located in the skull and facial bones.
27%) Table-3: Details of Craniofacial Injuries Occurred in RTA Type of Injury Type of Vehicle * Facial Bone Brain Injuries Intra Cranial Fracture Haemorrhage Two Wheeler 12(27.
Table 2 displays the prevalence of facial bone fractures according to gender.
Patients were followed until the study's end on December 31, 2003; loss of coverage from Medicare Parts A and B; or one of the following outcomes: a diagnosis of inflammatory conditions or osteomyelitis of the jaw, surgery on the facial bones, or death, whichever occurred first.
At some facilities, high-resolution computed tomography (CT) is currently the imaging modality of choice for the majority of facial bone fractures.
Mr Floyd was attacked by a man and Butlin tried to act as a peacemaker - but he then lost patience and punched Mr Floyd so hard he fractured a facial bone, which needed an operation.
The study also found that women had a significant decrease in facial bone volume at a younger age than men, causing them to see the signs of aging sooner.
With the late 18th century publication of his Physiognomische Fragmente, Johann Caspar Lavater helped popularize the "science" of readings people's facial bone structure and profiles for insight into their characters and inner dispositions.
4 million procedures annually, including spinal fusions, non-union fractures, dental defects and facial bone repair.
Patients with abnormal facial bone structure or respiration will be asked to sleep at the center to check their brain waves and ventricular waves and undergo an electromyogram of their jaw.
Sinusitis can also be caused by dental infections, facial bone fractures and enlarged, infected tonsils.
There are no pathognomonic findings, but certain characteristics are frequently present, such as facial bone involvement, particularly involvement of the mandible, which occurs in 80% of cases.