facial angle


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fa·cial an·gle

1. any of several variously named and variously defined anatomic angles that have been used to quantify facial protrusion;
2. in dentistry, the angle formed by the intersection of the orbitomeatal (Frankfort) plane with the nasion-pogonion line (inner lower angle), which establishes the anteroposterior relation of the mandible to the upper face at the orbitomeatal plane. Synonym(s): Frankfort-mandibular incisor angle

facial angle

[fāshəl]
Etymology: L, facies + angulus, a corner
the degree of protrusion of the lower face, assessed by measuring the inclination of the facial plane relative to the horizontal reference plane.

fa·cial an·gle

(fāshăl anggĕl)
1. Any of several variously named and variously defined anatomic angles that have been used to quantify facial protrusion.
2. In dentistry, angle formed by intersection of orbitomeatal plane with nasion-pogonion line, which establishes anteroposterior relation of mandible to upper face at the orbitomeatal plane.
Synonym(s): Frankfurt-mandibular incisor angle.

facial angle,

n an anthropomorphic expression of the degree of protrusion of the lower face, assessed by the measured inclination of the facial plane in relation to the Frankfort horizontal reference plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since race itself was seen as an inherently stable and stabilizing category, it is no wonder that the facial angle carne to be proof of that stability.
In the eighteenth century, in addition to skin color and hair, "the facial angle was the most extensively elaborated and artlessly abused criterion for racial somatology" (Haller, 1995, p.
Early issues featured song sheets and advice for musicians such as "how the facial angle affects clarinet playing".