vision therapy

(redirected from eye training)

vision therapy

A clinical approach for correcting and ameliorating the effects of eye movement disorders, non-strabismic binocular dysfunctions, focusing disorders, strabismus, amblyopia, nystagmus and certain visual perceptual (information processing) disorders.

Alternative ophthalmology
A vision-enhancing method developed in the 1920s by an American optometrist, AM Skeffington. Vision therapy uses eye exercises and other techniques to retrain the eyes to function as a unit, and co-ordinate the brain’s processing of visual information needed for binocular vision; it is allegedly useful for lazy eye (amblyopia), crossed eyes (strabismus), problems of focusing (vergence and accommodation), oculomotor defects, learning disabilities, athletic performance and traumatic brain injury. While vision therapy may be of use in developing stereoscopic skills and improving visual field remnants after brain damage, there is no clear scientific evidence supporting the use of eye exercises to improve vision.
References in periodicals archive ?
This specialized type of eye training is being offered on a large scale at 4D Vision Gym.
As of today, there are 4 eye-train hospitals, 15 "Microsurgical Eye Training Center", 17 "Chinese Lifeline Express Cataract Treatment Center", helping 130,000+ impoverished cataract patients have their second sight after surgery free of charge.
Colin Moulson, a qualified sports vision optometrist at Optical Express, commented: "Many people don't realise there is a separate eye examination available that is specific to sports, nor that following a simple eye training programme can help improve their coordination and visual awareness.
Colin Moulson, a qualified Sports Vision optometrist at Optical Express, explained: "Many people don't realise there is a separate eye examination available that is specific to sports, nor that following a simple eye training programme can help improve their coordination and visual awareness.
Findings from a study to be published in the Journal of Applied Sports Psychology show that Quiet Eye training can also aid the performance of novice golfers, improving the speed at which they learn to putt and helping them maintain performance under pressure.
When he began the foundation, Bolivia had three medical schools, but no eye training programs.