extubate


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ex·tu·bate

(eks'tū-bāt),
To remove a tube.

extubate (eks´toobāt),

v to remove a tube, usually an endotracheal anesthesia tube or a Levin gastric suction tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
His notes indicated "life-threatening hemorrhaging, check H& H (hemoglobin and hematocrit) and coags (blood coagulation), if not require [sic] more volume wean, extubate.
After four days on the ventilator, Rachel and the team were able to wean and extubate the patient.
Taking all of these clinical indicators into consideration, the decision was made to extubate her.
She added: "That (extubating) was well within my remit to take the decision to extubate the child without consulting anyone else.
The time had come to focus on comfort, not cure; consequently, they communicated the plan to withhold any further midazolam infusions, extubate Zahra, and transfer her to the neurology unit for palliative care measures.
Johnson's' testimony was significant to the extent that he made it crystal clear that it was uncommon for him to extubate his patients on the same day of surgery, tie stated that most of his cases were long, difficult cases.
SHOULD NURSES BE ALLOWED TO EXTUBATE A PATIENT WITHOUT A PHYSICIAN'S ORDER?
The components of the bundle are: Elevation of head of bed to between 30 and 45 degrees, deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis, peptic ulcer disease prophylaxis, daily sedation vacation and daily "sedation vacation" and daily assessment of readiness to extubate
We used a modification of this procedure in the case described herein, and we were able to extubate the patient on the first postoperative day.
In the 1970s, Prakash et al showed that it is possible, based on a halothane anesthetic, to extubate the trachea of cardiac surgical patients less than an hour after surgery.