extubate


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ex·tu·bate

(eks'tū-bāt),
To remove a tube.

extubate (eks´toobāt),

v to remove a tube, usually an endotracheal anesthesia tube or a Levin gastric suction tube.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arguably then, this could offer new and exciting opportunities for recovery practitioners to develop clinically and professionally, especially as intensive care nurses frequently extubate in the ICU without doctors present.
Ms Thomas said she was asked to help extubate Rohan at 4pm on September 29 - the day after he arrived at the hospital - by Ms Dallorzo.
There is an expectation in our trust that nurses will extubate patients within the PACU/recovery area.
After four days on the ventilator, Rachel and the team were able to wean and extubate the patient.
Down's syndrome has also been documented to be a predisposing risk factor for failure to extubate early19.
She added: "That (extubating) was well within my remit to take the decision to extubate the child without consulting anyone else.
If no local guidelines for extubation are available, the decision to extubate should be based on thorough patient assessment, good communication with the anaesthesia team, proper documentation and sound clinical judgement.
Johnson's' testimony was significant to the extent that he made it crystal clear that it was uncommon for him to extubate his patients on the same day of surgery, tie stated that most of his cases were long, difficult cases.
Both children were agitated and tried to extubate themselves, behavior that is not seen with an overdose of narcotics.
SHOULD NURSES BE ALLOWED TO EXTUBATE A PATIENT WITHOUT A PHYSICIAN'S ORDER?
Her general condition improved on 4th postoperative day and we managed to extubate her from the ventilator.
Surely this is essential for protecting our patient by providing suitably trained practitioners who can extubate with the appropriate levels of 'professional safety' for those who undertake such a role.