extrovert

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extrovert

 [ek´stro-vert]
1. a person whose interest is turned outward.
2. to turn one's interest outward to the external world.

ex·tra·vert

(eks'tră-vĕrt), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation extrovert.
A gregarious person whose chief interests lie outside the self, and who is socially self-confident and involved in the affairs of others. Compare: introvert.
Synonym(s): extrovert

extrovert

/ex·tro·vert/ (eks´tro-vert)
1. a person whose interest is turned outward.
2. to turn one's interest outward to the external world.

extrovert

also

extravert

(ĕk′strə-vûrt′)
n.
An extroverted person.

extrovert

[ik′strəvurt′]
1 a person whose interests are directed away from the self and concerned primarily with external reality and the physical environment rather than with inner feelings and thoughts. This person is usually highly sociable, outgoing, impulsive, and emotionally expressive.
2 a person characterized by extroversion. Also spelled extravert. Compare introvert.

ex·tro·vert

(eks'trŏ-vĕrt)
A gregarious person whose chief interests lie outside the self, and who is socially self confident and involved in the affairs of others.
Synonym(s): extravert
Compare: introvert
References in periodicals archive ?
Introverts also fall asleep when they want to stay awake more often than extroverts.
But extroverts breeze through these assignments, even taking the time to high-five everyone.
More teachers are asking all students to wait a minute before answering, so introverts get more of a chance and extroverts ponder answers more thoroughly.
This difference between introverts and extroverts in the enhancement of performance has been shown to be a physiologically induced activation--e.
Below are some of the persistent myths surrounding extroverts and introverts with interesting rebuttals.
As part of the three-stage selection procecandidates will be given 20-question test determine how much an introvert or extrovert they are.
The MBTI, which is based on Jungian personality theory, uses a series of questions, refined through research, to identify an individual's communication style among four categories: 1) extrovert or introvert, 2) sensing or intuitive, 3) thinker or feeler and 4) judger or perceiver.
If you want to discover whether you are an introvert or extrovert, this book tell you within its first few pages; and the answer may just surprise you.
Are there not ways that extroverts can learn to better adapt in order to benefit from introverts' style and contributions?
The data are clear that extroverts are much more likely than are introverts to seek sales positions, to be recruited for sales positions and to be rated highly by supervisors in those jobs.
Dembling's book combines the results of scientific studies and her own experiences, while Susan Cain, another author who wrote about introversion, labeled leaders: Barack Obama, for example, is an introvert; Bill Clinton, an extrovert.
She points out, for example, that while extroverts ajump on ina and begin aa friendly stream of pattera almost immediately with anyone at any networking event, introverts are good listeners and planners.