extremity


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extremity

 [ek-strem´ĭ-te]
1. the distal or terminal portion of elongated or pointed structures.
2. limb.

ex·trem·i·ty

(eks-trem'i-tē), [TA]
In clinical terms, often used to describe the portions of the appendicular skeleton (that is, upper extremity, lower extremity).
See also: limb, end, pole.
Synonym(s): extremitas [TA]

extremity

/ex·trem·i·ty/ (eks-trem´ĭ-te)
1. the distal or terminal portion of elongated or pointed structures.
2. limb.

extremity

(ĭk-strĕm′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. extremi·ties
1. The outermost or farthest point or portion: at the extremity of the peninsula.
2. The greatest or utmost degree: the extremity of despair.
3. Grave danger, necessity, or distress: people in extremity.
4. An extreme or severe measure: had to resort to extremities in the crisis.
5.
a. A bodily limb: She is in a wheelchair because of weakness of the lower extremities.
b. extremities The hands and feet: Frostbite affects the extremities first.

extremity

[ikstrem′itē]
Etymology: L, extremitas
a limb or appendage. The arm may be identified by the layperson as an upper extremity and the leg as a lower extremity.

ex·trem·i·ty

(eks-trem'i-tē) [TA]
One of the ends of an elongated or pointed structure. Incorrectly (but very commonly) used to mean limb.
Synonym(s): extremitas [TA] .

extremity

limb

ex·trem·i·ty

(eks-trem'i-tē) [TA]
One of the ends of an elongated or pointed structure. Incorrectly (but very commonly) used to mean limb.

extremity

(ikstrem´itē),
n an arm or a leg; the arm may be identified as an upper extremity, and the leg as a lower extremity.

extremity

1. the distal or terminal portion of elongated or pointed structures.
2. the limb, tail, ear.
References in classic literature ?
Stand up, Isaac, and hearken to me,'' said the Palmer, who viewed the extremity of his distress with a compassion in which contempt was largely mingled; ``you have cause for your terror, considering how your brethren have been used, in order to extort from them their hoards, both by princes and nobles; but stand up, I say, and I will point out to you the means of escape.
However, this is an extremity to which the prince is seldom driven, neither indeed is he willing to put it in execution; nor dare his ministers advise him to an action, which, as it would render them odious to the people, so it would be a great damage to their own estates, which all lie below; for the island is the king's demesne.
This cape forms the extremity of Arabia Petraea, comprised between the Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Acabah.
Had she been left to herself in her late extremity, she would probably have used her faculties to the utmost, and with discretion, in protecting her person; but, encumbered with her inanimate friend, retreat was a thing not to be attempted.
In that, he had represented Cass as having shamefully deserted his companions in their extremity, carrying off with him a horse; in the one now given, he spoke of him as having been killed in the affray with the Arapahays.
Johnson vows that if I persist in the connection, he will settle in the country for the rest of his life, and you know it is impossible to submit to such an extremity while any other alternative remains.
That at the eastern extremity was hung, for example in blue--and vividly blue were its windows.
Half of that which belongs to the individuals should be at the extremity of the country, the other half near the city, so that these two portions being allotted to each person, all would partake of land in both places, which would be both equal and right; and induce them to act in concert with greater harmony in any war with their neighbours: for when the land is not divided in this manner, one party neglects the inroads of the enemy on the borders, the other makes it a matter of too much consequence and more than is necessary; for which reason in some places there is a law which forbids the inhabitants of the borders to have any vote in the council when they are debating upon a war which is made against them as their private interest might prevent their voting impartially.
Why, that this lake, the lower extremity of which is in two degrees and thirty minutes, must extend also two degrees and a half above the equator.
When Aramis had seen to all these things, and appeared satisfied with the result of his inspection, "Let us consult Porthos," said he, "to know if we must endeavor to get the boat out by the unknown extremity of the grotto, following the descent and the shade of the cavern, or whether it be better, in the open air, to make it slide upon its rollers through the bushes, leveling the road of the little beach, which is but twenty feet high, and gives, at high tide, three or four fathoms of good water upon a sound bottom.
The window (occupying, as I have said, almost the entire length and height of the wall) was divided into three compartments, and was adorned at their extremity by handsome curtains of dark red velvet.
There is the man whom we all know, stupid, unimaginative, whose brain is bitten numbly by numb maggots; who walks generously with wide-spread, tentative legs, falls frequently in the gutter, and who sees, in the extremity of his ecstasy, blue mice and pink elephants.