extravasation


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extravasation

 [eks-trav″ah-za´shun]
1. a discharge or escape, as of blood, from a vessel into the tissues.
2. the inadvertent administration of a vesicant into the tissues; the intensity of the irritating action is so severe that plasma escapes from the extracellular space and blisters are formed. Large extravasations of some medications may lead to contractures, with the need for débridement and grafting and in severe cases amputation. This term must be distinguished from intravenous infiltration and flare.
3. blood or another substance so discharged.

ex·trav·a·sa·tion

(eks-trav'ă-sā'shŭn),
1. The act of extravasating.
2. Synonym(s): extravasate (2)
[extra- + L. vas, vessel]

extravasation

/ex·trav·a·sa·tion/ (ek-strav″ah-za´shun)
1. a discharge or escape, as of blood, from a vessel into the tissues; blood or other substance so discharged.
2. the process of being extravasated.

extravasation

[ikstrav′əsā′shən]
Etymology: L, extra + vas, vessel
1 a passage or escape into the tissues, usually of blood, serum, lymph or infusion. Compare bleeding.
2 passage or escape into tissue of antineoplastic chemotherapeutic drugs. Signs and symptoms may be sudden onset of localized pain at an injection site, sudden redness or extreme pallor at an injection site, or loss of blood return in an IV needle. Tissue slough and necrosis may occur if the condition is severe. Treatment depends on the causative agent. Nursing responsibilities include maintaining the patient IV line, elevating the affected area, applying ice packs, and notifying the physician of the need for antidote injections, if applicable. See also exudate, transudate. extravasate, v.

extravasation

Medtalk The seepage of fluid–eg, plasma, from a mucocutaneous surface, from underlying capillaries.

ex·trav·a·sa·tion

(eks-trav'ă-sā'shŭn)
The act of extravasating.
[extra- + L. vas, vessel]

extravasation

(eks-trav?a-sa'shun)
Enlarge picture
EXTRAVASATION: Massive release of fluid into the tissues of the lower lips of a patient with angiodema
The escape of fluid from its physiologic contained space, e.g., bile, blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), into the surrounding tissue. See: illustration Synonym: suffusion

extravasation

An abnormal escape into the tissues of a fluid such as blood, serum or lymph.

extravasation

blood incorporated into local callus or hyperkeratosis (changing its colour from dull yellow to dark brown to black) due to exudation from skin capillaries, in response to applied intermittent pressure

extravasation (ek·stra·v·sāˑ·shn),

n 1. seeping of blood, lymph, or serum into tissues.
2. seeping of chemotherapeutic drugs into a tissue.

ex·trav·a·sa·tion

(eks-trav'ă-sā'shŭn)
The act of extravasating.
[extra- + L. vas, vessel]

extravasation (ekstrav´əzā´shən),

n the escape of a body fluid out of its proper place (e.g., blood into surrounding tissues after rupture of a vessel, urine into surrounding tissues after rupture of the bladder).

extravasation

1. a discharge or escape, as of blood, from a vessel into the tissues; blood or other substance so discharged.
2. the process of being extravasated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Extravasation of contrast is toxic to the skin and surrounding tissues and produces an acute local inflammatory response.
Routine axial contrast enhanced CT demonstrates active extravasation of intravenous contrast into the anterior pericardium (arrow).
Peripelvic extravasation during intravenous urography, evidence for an additional route for backflow after ureteral obstruction," The Journal of Urology, vol.
Embolization was performed when free extravasation, aneurysm, pseudoaneurysm, arteriocalyceal fistula (ACF), or arteriovenous fistula (AVF) was detected.
We considered that extravasation of irrigation fluid had spread to compress the trachea in a circumferential manner.
In the CTA, we were able to detect a rupture of the right external carotid artery, slightly above the carotid bifurcation, and of the right internal carotid artery, both with obvious contrast agent extravasation (Figure 3, A).
Davis Medical Center, where Patricia was diagnosed with a severe extravasation of chemothercapy over the right shoulder and subclavian region.
However, according to Lisa Schulmeister, RN, MN, APRN-BC, OCN[R], FAAN, "Researchers in Australia found that the extravasation rate of vincristine minibag infusions was infrequent and similar to the extravasation rate when syringes were used.