extrapolate

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extrapolate

(ĕks″tră′pō-lāt″)
To infer a point between two given, or known, points on a graph or progression. Thus, if an infant weighed 20 lb at a certain age and 4 months later weighed 23 lb, it could be inferred that at a point halfway between the two time periods, the infant might have weighed 21.5 lb.

extrapolate (ekstrap´ōlāt),

v to infer values beyond the observable range from an observed trend of variables; to project by inference into the unexplored.
References in periodicals archive ?
For a more complete list of gross output extrapolators by industry, see Brian C.
The comparison of gross output estimates between the benchmark and annual I-O accounts highlights industries where the annual extrapolators may need additional scrutiny.
Principal Source Data for Value-Added Extrapolators Component of gross domestic income Major source data Compensation of employees, paid Wage and salary accruals (1) BLS tabulations of wages and salaries of employees covered by state UI programs and OPM data on wages and salaries of Federal Government employees.
To reflect this change, the average ratios of other liability (OLB) to miscellaneous liabilities (MLB) for 1975, 1976, and 1977 was computed, and then the average ratios were used as the extrapolators to approximate net premiums earned and net losses incurred for other liability.
Unfortunately, quarterly information on the value of exercised nonqualified options is not available on which to base an adjustment to the extrapolator.
Research showed that using separate extrapolators for compensation and for PTI achieved better results than simply extrapolating industry GDP by wage and salary accruals, because the composition of GDP by industry can change significantly from year to year.
This is a significant problem because owing to the absence of price indexes 23 percent of GDP is measured using either physical inputs as extrapolators (mainly labor hours) or as input-cost indexes, which produce zero or low growth in labor productivity and often negative growth in multifactor productivity because of the rapid rate of growth in investment and capital stocks.
First, a number of the industries that are heavy users of the new information technology, such as education and certain financial services, are deflated using cost-based indexes or by input and partial output extrapolators.
The TSA extrapolators are based on nominal values of industry output, so they include relative price effects.