extraneous


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Related to extraneous: extraneous root

ex·tra·ne·ous

(eks-trā'nē-ŭs),
Outside of the organism and not belonging to it.
[L. extraneus]

extraneous

[exstrā′nē·əs]
Etymology: L, strange
originating or entering from outside the organism.

extraneous

(ĕks-trā′nē-ŭs) [L. extraneus, external]
Outside and unrelated to an organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other than the benefits aforementioned, self-explanation may enhance learning by reducing extraneous cognitive load.
Track fracture is either caused by poor maintenance or there can also be man- made factors which can be termed as extraneous or sabotage.
One possible interpretation of Sweller's conclusion is that distinguishing between extraneous and intrinsic cognitive load requires consideration be given to the learning objectives specified for a particular task.
If MacDonough ruled that a full ACA repeal measure was extraneous to a budget reconciliation measure, advocates of repeal might be able to find another way to achieve full repeal.
In future if any officer attempts to bring extraneous influence in respect of his or her posting, transfer, deputation, etc.
Most high school students and college freshmen struggle with the concept of extraneous roots in an algebra course (1).
We'd hope you would join us in that, looking forward to do the very best we can with positive thoughts and not dwelling on all these sort of what are now frankly historical, extraneous issues.
The software automatically rejects extraneous and non-targeted photons.
Further, the improvements in fluorescence-detection technology enable differentiation of subtle differences of chlorophyll levels in objects to detect and remove extraneous vegetable material.
The lieutenant governor, arguably the most extraneous job in all of Sacramento, will be paid $154,875, up from the current $131,250.
Satinover states: "The reality is that, since 1994, there has existed solid epidemiological evidence, now extensively confirmed and reconfirmed, that the most common natural course for a young person who develops a 'homosexual identity' is for it to spontaneously disappear unless that person is discouraged or interfered with by extraneous factors [our emphasis].