extraction coefficient

ex·trac·tion co·ef·fi·cient

the percentage of a substance removed from the blood or plasma in a single passage through a tissue; for example, the extraction coefficient for p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) in the kidney is the difference between arterial and renal venous plasma PAH concentrations, divided by the arterial plasma PAH concentration.

ex·trac·tion co·ef·fi·cient

(ek-strak'shŭn kō-ĕ-fish'ĕnt)
The percentage of a substance removed from the blood or plasma in a single passage through a tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
plant at the Ararat facility, which would significantly increase the extraction coefficient for sulphide-heavy ores from the Sotk mine.
Tadalafil Recovery After Extraction: Drug-Free Human Serum Was Spiked With Tadalafil at Different Concentrations and Extraction Coefficient Calculated Concentration Average Extraction (ng/mL) Coefficient (%) (n=3 for each level) 10 76.
Dissolved P = extraction coefficient * available soil P * overland flow volume (1)
1]), and extraction coefficient is the fraction of STP that can be released to overland flow for a given flow event volume (cm).
Most models use a constant extraction coefficient value, assuming that STP extractability is similar among soils.
Using erosion as a factor approximating land cover, the extraction coefficient (slope of the linear relationship between STP and dissolved P in overland flow) increased with greater erosion or reduced soil cover (Figure 3).
Instead, they incorporate added P into the soil P pool and adjust or recalibrate the extraction coefficient.
For modeling purposes, extraction coefficients can be determined as the slope of the linear regression of STP and overland flow dissolved P (Figure 1a).
New information on soil and site dependency of extraction coefficients relating STP and overland flow dissolved P and the use of enrichment ratios to estimate particulate P transport should be incorporated into these models.