extracorporeal photochemotherapy

extracorporeal photochemotherapy

a procedure for treating pemphigus vulgaris by treating the patient's blood outside the body. Certain drugs are first administered to the patient. Some of the patient's blood is then removed temporarily for exposure to ultraviolet light outside the body. The blood, after treatment, is returned to the patient. See also photochemotherapy.

extracorporeal photochemotherapy

The exposure of blood that is temporarily removed from the body to ultraviolet A radiation. This is used to treat several diseases, including pemphigus vulgaris and cutaneous T cell lymphoma.

CAUTION!

Patients exposed to photosensitizing agents, such as psoralens in conjunction with ultraviolet light, have an increased risk of melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma. They should be examined regularly so that any developing skin cancers will be detected early.
References in periodicals archive ?
Building contracts divided into two parts deliveries are 1) three pieces of therapeutic separators intended for routine diagnosis of extracorporeal photochemotherapy and preparation of mononuclear cells to anti-tumor vaccines2) 1 piece separator for donor interventions - the separation of platelets deleucotized in line at a centrifugal separation procedure.
Treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma by extracorporeal photochemotherapy.
Extracorporeal photochemotherapy for the treatment of graft-versus-host disease.
Successful use of extracorporeal photochemotherapy in the treatment of severe acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease.
Extracorporeal photochemotherapy for paediatric patients with graft-versus-host disease after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
Extracorporeal photochemotherapy in the treatment of severe steroid-refractory acute graft-versus-host disease: a pilot study.
The effect of intensified extracorporeal photochemotherapy on long-term survival in patients with severe acute graft-versus-host disease.
Theralux(TM) comprises several different clinical programs, including Theralux(TM)-ECP, a program to treat autoimmune diseases refractory to standard therapies through the process of extracorporeal photochemotherapy (ECP) and Theralux(TM)-GvHD, a program for leukemia and lymphoma patients to facilitate mismatched blood stem cell transplants by providing patients with donor T cells necessary to fight infections pretreated with Theralux(TM) to reduce their ability to cause graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) without reducing their ability to fight infections and the leukemia.
Building contracts divided into two parts deliveries are:1) three pieces of therapeutic separators intended for routine diagnosis for extracorporeal photochemotherapy and preparation of mononuclear cells in a cancer vaccine;2) 1 piece separator for donor interventions - the separation of platelets deleucotized in line at a centrifugal separation procedure.
3) ECP for treatment of autoimmune diseases: the treatment of blood from an autoimmune or chronic GvHD patient to remove the offending immune cells and alter the immune response in the patient; this process is known as extracorporeal photochemotherapy (ECP).
Investigators found that Targretin capsule therapy reliably induced rapid responses in these erythrodemic patients who had been refractory to interferon, extracorporeal photochemotherapy, electron beam radiotherapy, photochemotherapy with ultraviolet-A, topical chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and combinations of these therapies.

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