environment

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environment

 [en-vi´ron-ment]
the aggregate of surrounding conditions or influences on an individual.

en·vi·ron·ment

(en-vī'rŏn-ment),
The milieu; the aggregate of all of the external conditions and influences affecting the life and development of an organism. It can be divided into physical, biologic, social, cultural; any or all of which can influence the health status of the population.
[Fr. environ, around]

environment

/en·vi·ron·ment/ (en-vi´ron-ment) the sum total of all the conditions and elements that make up the surroundings and influence the development of an individual.environmen´tal

environment

(ĕn-vī′rən-mənt, -vī′ərn-)
n.
a. The totality of the natural world, often excluding humans: "Technology, of course, lies at the heart of man's relationship with the environment" (Mark Hertsgaard).
b. A subset of the natural world; an ecosystem: the coastal environment.
c. The combination of external physical conditions that affect and influence the growth, development, behavior, and survival of organisms: "Conditions in a lion's environment ... can drive it to hunt people" (Philip Caputo).
d. The complex of social and cultural conditions affecting the nature of an individual person or community.

environment

Etymology: Gk, en, in; L, viron, circle
all of the many factors, both physical and psychological, that influence or affect the life and survival of a person. See also biome, climate. environmental, adj.

en·vi·ron·ment

(en-vī'rŏn-mĕnt)
The milieu; the aggregate of all of the external conditions and influences affecting the life and development of an organism.
[Fr. environ, around]

environment

the surroundings of any organism, including the MEDIUM, SUBSTRATE, climatic conditions, other organisms (see BIOTIC FACTORS), light and pH.

en·vi·ron·ment

(en-vī'rŏn-mĕnt)
The milieu; aggregate of all external conditions and influences affecting life and development of an organism.
[Fr. environ, around]

environment (envī´rənment, en-vī´urnment),

n the aggregate of all the external conditions and influences affecting the life and development of an organism.
environment, extracellular,
n the external, or interstitial, environment provided and maintained for the tissue cells.
environment, oral,
n all oral conditions present and their influences.

environment

the sum total of all the conditions and elements that make up the surroundings and influence the development of an animal. The environment of animals is often assumed to comprise only physical, chemical and biological factors but society is gradually coming to appreciate that there is also an emotional and psychological side to the life of all animals.

Patient discussion about environment

Q. what environment is recommended for one who has Asthma?

A. dry and clean. as less pollens, dust, pollution - the better is for the asthmatic. any allergen in the environment would cause attacks. (as long as he is allergic..)

Q. i feel huge tension when i am in close narrow environment , is it a phobia?

A. Yes, it may be considered a phobia, or more specifically situational type phobia. However, the important thing is whether is this fear reasonable? Do you think it's out of proportion? Phobia is a fear that one perceive as irrational and out of proportion and yet one feels and is affected adversely by it. If this fear is appropriate (e.g. fear of falling in mountain climbing) it's not a phobia.

You may read more about it http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/phobias.html

Q. how exactly dust effects on asthmatic people? how can one avoid a dust environment?

A. some people try to dust proof there home,they change there matress once a year-----thay do not have rugs in there home---no curtains or draps --and they have someone else dust and clean/no pets.some people keep there pets and take allergie meds.

More discussions about environment
References in periodicals archive ?
The increased level of conjugation occurring in biofilms may be the result of protection of the microbes from shear forces brought on by fluid flow in the extracellular environment.
Beginning with discussion of body function and the chemical composition of the body, the 20 illustrated chapters progressively address chapters including: enzymes and energy, interactions between cells and the extracellular environment, the nervous system, sensory physiology, endocrine glands, blood and circulation, cardiac output, the immune system, respiratory physiology, the digestive system, regulation of metabolism, and reproduction.
Osteoclasts first attach to mineralized surfaces and actively resorb bone, releasing calcium into the extracellular environment (79).
In order for calcium to participate in cellular signal transduction processes, it has to be brought into the cell form the extracellular environment.