extinction


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Related to extinction: Mass extinction, Extinction of Species

extinction

 [eks-ting´shun]
in psychology, the disappearance of a conditioned response as a result of its not being reinforced; also, the process by which the disappearance is accomplished. See also conditioning.

ex·tinc·tion

(eks-tingk'shŭn),
1. In behavior modification or in classical or operant conditioning, a progressive decrease in the frequency of a response that is not positively reinforced; the withdrawal of reinforcers known to maintain an undesirable behavior.
2. Synonym(s): absorbance
[L. extinguo, to quench]

extinction

/ex·tinc·tion/ (eks-tink´shun) in psychology, the disappearance of a conditioned response as a result of nonreinforcement; also, the process by which the disappearance is accomplished.

extinction

(ĭk-stĭngk′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act of extinguishing: The extinction of the fire took several hours.
b. The condition of being extinguished: mourned the extinction of her dreams.
2. The fact of being extinct or the process of becoming extinct: the extinction of the passenger pigeon; languages that are in danger of extinction.
3. Psychology A reduction or a loss in the strength or rate of a conditioned response when the unconditioned stimulus or reinforcement is withheld.
4. Physiology A gradual decrease in the excitability of a nerve to a previously adequate stimulus, usually resulting in total loss of excitability.

extinction

[iksting′shən]
a state of being lost or destroyed.

extinction

Psychiatry A facet of operant–classical conditioning, in which the conditioned response is weakened and eventually disappears by nonreinforcement. See Operant conditioning, Respondent conditioning, Sensory extinction.

ex·tinc·tion

(eks-tingk'shŭn)
1. In behavior modification or classical or operant conditioning, a progressive decrease in the frequency of a response that is not positively reinforced.
See: conditioning
2. Synonym(s): absorbance.
[L. extinguo, to quench]

extinction

  1. the act of making EXTINCT or the state of being extinct.
  2. the elimination of an allele of a gene in a population, due to RANDOM GENETIC DRIFT or to adverse SELECTION pressures.
  3. any periodical, catastrophic event resulting in a species or larger taxonomic group dying out abruptly at a particular point in geological history. Such extinctions are thought to be cyclical, occurring every 28.4 million years, and have been attributed to cosmic activity such as showers of large asteroids or comets, though neither the periodicity nor its causes are at present universally accepted.

extinction

the disappearance of a conditioned response as a result of nonreinforcement.
References in periodicals archive ?
It backs up the theory that volcanoes in that area contributed to the mass extinction, which killed off 95 percent of marine life and 70 percent of the land-dwellers.
Following the identification of the reinforcer(s) maintaining problem behavior, a treatment that incorporates extinction of Response A and reinforcement of an appropriate response (e.
So we brought in the dinosaurs, using them as a platform, and we hope that through this interesting group of animals, we can talk about the sixth extinction,' Lok points out.
Graduated extinction may then be introduced to reduce nocturnal wakefulness during the night (if needed).
But the established understanding of the Permian extinction is "up in the air," said John Geissman of the University of Texas at Dallas.
The projected extinction rate changes with time and how much warming there is from the burning of coal, oil and gas.
And, if we don't, will the habitats' deterioration eventually halt the mass extinction by eliminating its root cause--us?
Over the next several decades, many scientists--including Charles Darwin--helped develop the scientific concept of extinction.
Nova has always excelled in the presenting scientific detective stories, and The Last Extinction is no exception.
6 ( ANI ): The sizes of organisms following mass extinction events may vary more than previously believed, which may be inconsistent with the predictions of the so-called 'Lilliput effect.
This two-volume encyclopedia on animal extinction is part of a 17-volume set on the animal kingdom and is meant to complement the evolution volume published in 2011.