exteroceptive


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ex·ter·o·cep·tive

(eks'ter-ō-sep'tiv),
Relating to the exteroceptors; denoting the surface of the body containing the end organs adapted to receive impressions or stimuli from without.
[L. exterus, outside, + capio, to take]

exteroceptive

[ek′stərōsep′tiv]
Etymology: L, externus, outside, recipere, to receive
pertaining to stimuli that originate from outside the body or to the sensory receptors that they activate. Compare interoceptive, proprioception.

ex·ter·o·cep·tive

(eks'tĕr-ō-sep'tiv)
Relating to the exteroceptors; denoting the surface of the body containing the end organs adapted to receive impressions or stimuli from without.
[L. exterus, outside, + capio, to take]

exteroceptive

(ĕks″tĕr-ō-sĕp′tĭv) [L. externus, outside, + receptus, having received]
Pert. to receptors detecting external (environmental) stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
C(W) represents the exteroceptive categorization (perception).
Avoidance conditioning with brief shock and no exteroceptive warning signal.
Exteroceptive context in taste-aversion conditioning and extinction: Odour, cage, and bottle stimuli.
These exteroceptive contextual cues, along with target behaviors in the drug-taking sequence, are conceptualized as Pavlovian CSs (see Siegel & Ramos, 2002).
Again, the response rate discrepancy observed during the first phase was maintained during the second one such that during the multiple FI FI schedule, higher rates occurred in the presence of the exteroceptive stimuli that was previously correlated to the FR schedule than in the presence of the stimulus previously correlated to the DRL schedule (see also Okouchi, 2003a, 2003b; Okouchi & Lattal, 2006).
This may be one important distinction between exteroceptive stimulus control and interoceptive stimulus control produced by drug states.
These data are consistent with results of similar investigations involving exteroceptive [S.
In contrast, change in response frequency in a chained schedule can be equally attributed to component transition and change in the exteroceptive stimulus.
One of the first demonstrations of this dates back to work of Estes and Skinner (1941) who found that an exteroceptive CS, previously paired with a noxious US (foot-shock), suppressed the rate of operant food-reinforced responding (i.
DeGrandpre, Bickel, and Higgins (1992) used a nonautomated procedure to assess the establishment of equivalence relations between interoceptive drug stimuli and exteroceptive visual stimuli.
The basis of the discrimination in the present experiment were presumably the exteroceptive stimulus changes provided by the experimenter.