exteriorize

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Related to exteriorizing: bradyesthesia

exteriorize

 [eks-te´re-er-īz]
1. to form a correct mental reference of the image of an object seen.
2. in psychiatry, to turn one's interest outward.
3. to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz),
1. To direct a patient's interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of experiment.
3. Fixation of a segment of bowel with blood supply intact to the outer aspect of the abdominal wall.

exteriorize

/ex·te·ri·or·ize/ (ek-stēr´e-ah-rīz)
1. to form a correct mental reference of the image of an object seen.
2. in psychiatry, to turn one's interest outward.
3. to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.

exteriorize

(ĭk-stîr′ē-ə-rīz′)
tr.v. exterior·ized, exterior·izing, exterior·izes
Medicine To expose (an internal organ or body part), as in surgery.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz)
1. To direct interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of physiologic experiment.
Synonym(s): exteriorise.

exteriorize

to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
It also addresses all modes of exteriorizing the sexed body.
My one exteriorizing "frame" was the determination that each of the stories would be five pages of single-spaced typing, that being at this time my sense of requisite length for a story's being able to pass as such.
mediated communications) itself, the culture-binding, exteriorizing process peculiar to this species, from cave paintings to Web pages.
Though Jessica Prinz, for example, has noted the differences between much Expressionist theatre and Beckett's drama, in that Beckett's plays are 'minimal and understated' in contrast with Expressionism's reliance on 'spectacular effects', (25) the fundamental Expressionist principles of exteriorizing interior struggles, and the 'alienation between self and world' in Erik Tonning's words, (26) can be related to the scenic space of Eleutheria, and indeed, much of Beckett's later drama.
Walter Benjamin, in his tribute to nineteenth-century interiorizing and exteriorizing, the Arcades Project, describes a similar type of desire predicated, he feels, on what he calls "threshold magic": "Like all magic substance, this too is once again reduced at some point to sex--in pornography.