exteriorize


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Related to exteriorize: monophasia

exteriorize

 [eks-te´re-er-īz]
1. to form a correct mental reference of the image of an object seen.
2. in psychiatry, to turn one's interest outward.
3. to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz),
1. To direct a patient's interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of experiment.
3. Fixation of a segment of bowel with blood supply intact to the outer aspect of the abdominal wall.

exteriorize

/ex·te·ri·or·ize/ (ek-stēr´e-ah-rīz)
1. to form a correct mental reference of the image of an object seen.
2. in psychiatry, to turn one's interest outward.
3. to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.

exteriorize

(ĭk-stîr′ē-ə-rīz′)
tr.v. exterior·ized, exterior·izing, exterior·izes
Medicine To expose (an internal organ or body part), as in surgery.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz)
1. To direct interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of physiologic experiment.
Synonym(s): exteriorise.

exteriorize

to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
The question we must pose is, "Why exteriorize or transcend out of oneself?
He can interiorize or exteriorize as he sees fit, as he is the grand master of metafiction.
Additionally, since the catheter could be advanced over the guidewire, there would be no need to snare and exteriorize the guidewire to form an arteriovenous loop.
The judgmental statements do provide though an index of the communicators' declared feelings; their judgments exteriorize what is interior.
What's at work here is that protective tendency to exteriorize evil, both in the reader who asks such a question and the writer who avoids introspection and who, consequently, creates protagonists who are flatly good and antagonists who are flatly bad.
For example, papers in Meskell and Pels (2005) argue from the vantage point of anthropology, archaeology and ethnography, 'a view on ethics that emphasizes the priority of practical ethical engagement of the professional self with its audiences and criticizes the dominant tendency to disembed, exteriorize, and alienate ethics from everyday scientific practice' (Meskell and Pels 2005:1, original emphasis).
The exterior surface does no longer attempt to dominate the interior; on the contrary, its aim is to exteriorize the inside and articulate it.
Concluding, we could additionally exteriorize upon early childhood bilingualism theories, suggested by Baker (2006:102-103) and communication strategies, used within a family:
Or maybe he is attempting to exteriorize the self-image of these characters, who consider themselves charismatic gods rather than squalid killers.
Meanwhile, a range of artists and aesthetes, who dream of Cthulhu without previous knowledge of him, wish to exteriorize their intuitions.
The MP has shifted the criterion of explanatory adequacy, and theories are now evaluated according to their capacity to account for the adjustment of the Faculty of Language (henceforth, FL) to the cognitive modules that it is supposed to connect with: on the one hand, the systems of thought by which we represent the external world or we figure out the mental states of other people, and, on the other, the sensory-motor systems by which we exteriorize and internalize the signals containing our and other people's thoughts.
According to Dianteill, the process of identification provides a co-existence of the human spirit and the oricha in the corporal envelope, enabling the homosexual santeros to interject a feminine principal in the initiation process, and in the possession process the possibility to exteriorize it.