exteriorize

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Related to exteriorisation: externalise

exteriorize

 [eks-te´re-er-īz]
1. to form a correct mental reference of the image of an object seen.
2. in psychiatry, to turn one's interest outward.
3. to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz),
1. To direct a patient's interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of experiment.
3. Fixation of a segment of bowel with blood supply intact to the outer aspect of the abdominal wall.

exteriorize

/ex·te·ri·or·ize/ (ek-stēr´e-ah-rīz)
1. to form a correct mental reference of the image of an object seen.
2. in psychiatry, to turn one's interest outward.
3. to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.

exteriorize

(ĭk-stîr′ē-ə-rīz′)
tr.v. exterior·ized, exterior·izing, exterior·izes
Medicine To expose (an internal organ or body part), as in surgery.

ex·te·ri·or·ize

(eks-tēr'ē-ōr-īz)
1. To direct interests, thoughts, or feelings into a channel leading outside the self, to some definite aim or object.
2. To expose an organ temporarily for observation, or permanently for purposes of physiologic experiment.
Synonym(s): exteriorise.

exteriorize

to transpose an internal organ to the exterior of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
One can readily see how this reading of individuation as potential for reinterpretation would confirm Hansen's suspicion that Stiegler, as with other thinkers of 'technesis', simply reduces the technical, through interpretation, to the exteriorisation of thought.
Such a thinking marks a break with technesis, that is, thinking technology as the exteriorisation of thought, a tendency which he diagnoses both in 'poststructuralists', such as Derrida, Lacan and Deleuze, and the science studies of, for example, Bruno Latour.
Since exteriorisation or grammatisation are in some sense essential--we can't do without them--the critique offered by Stiegler is more nuanced.
Hypomnemata, from mnematon or memory-device, are mechanisms and techniques for the 'technical artificialisation and exteriorisation of memory', the 'artificial supports of memory in all their forms, from the prehistoric incised bone to the MP3; passing through the writing of the Bible, through the invention and implementation of printing, to photography and phonography, etc.
Cette forme rebelle de pentecotisme, en favorisant une forte exteriorisation de l'emotion religieuse, une exuberance dans l'exaltation et la gestuelle, invite le lumpen haitien a se refugier dans un imaginaire de resistance et de marronage (p.
26) Stiegler adapts Leroi-Gourhan's thinking with regard to exteriorisation by means of the concept of 'epiphylogenesis' - memory stored beyond the species, which Stiegler also describes by way of the phenomenology of Husserl as 'tertiary retention'.
This 'tertiary' layer of retention exists as material culture into which we are born, into a world not of our own making so to speak, though as the exteriorisation and spatialisation of individual time becoming collective time, 'tertiary retention is an original exteriorization of mind' (FNC, p9).
Hence the ambiguity of what Stiegler calls prosthetic 'exteriorisation', which does not presuppose a previous interiority but rather, as in Heidegger, proceeds as a play between ground and abyss, a play between exteriorisation and interiorisation: There is no human interiority that would precede the process of prosthetic exteriorisation: 'this interiority is nothing outside of its exteriorisation: the issue is therefore neither that of an interiority nor that of exteriority--but that of an originary complex in which the two terms, far from being opposed, compose with one another .
But the question of memory became the question of technics, because Leroi-Gourhan's conclusion (it's the last part of Gesture and Speech--the first note of the last section) is that what constitutes the phenomenon of hominisation is the exteriorisation of memory, and that every technical object is a memory-object.
I have, however, tried to show in a work yet to appear that their analysis neglects the fact that the imagination is always constituted through transitional artefacts and that it is not the technical exteriorisation of the imagination that causes the short-circuit, but rather the cultural hegemony that psychopower exercises on what must be understood as a pharmakon.
6) More particularly, Lyotard has a problem with representing May '68 because he wants to interpret it as a critique of representation itself, both as institutionalised in the political party or the labour union and in its broadest sense as 'the exteriorisation of activity', or 'the mise en spectacle' that turns actors into mere role-players and 'public opinion' into a mere spectator of events.