extend

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Related to extending: ascertainment, confining, scrutinised

ex·tend

(eks-tend'),
To straighten a limb, to diminish or extinguish the angle formed by flexion; to place the distal segment of a limb in such a position that its axis is continuous with that of the proximal segment.
[L. ex- tendo, pp. -tensus, to stretch out]

ex·tend

(eks-tend')
To straighten a limb, to diminish or extinguish the angle formed by flexion; to place the distal segment of a limb in such a position that its axis is continuous with that of the proximal segment.
[L. ex-tendo, pp. -tensus, to stretch out]

extend

(ĕk-stĕnd′) [Gr. ex, out, + L. tendere, to stretch]
1. To straighten a joint such as the knee or elbow by increasing the angle formed by the proximal and distal bones.
2. To move forward.
3. To increase the angle between the bones forming a joint.
References in classic literature ?
He called the next morning, no doubt with a liberal proposal for extending the engagement beyond Derby and Nottingham.
And so exactly was the expression repeated on the fair young face of her who had crept along the wall to a point where she could see him, and where she now stood looking at him, with hands which at first had been only raised in frightened compassion, if not even to keep him off and shut out the sight of him, but which were now extending towards him, trembling with eagerness to lay the spectral face upon her warm young breast, and love it back to life and hope--so exactly was the expression repeated (though in stronger characters) on her fair young face, that it looked as though it had passed like a moving light, from him to her.
Micawber taking a bland delight in extending his patronage to Uriah.
The soldiers were in front of us, extending into a pretty wide line with an interval between man and man.
I was born a native of these parts,'' answered their guide, and as he made the reply they stood before the mansion of Cedric; a low irregular building, containing several court-yards or enclosures, extending over a considerable space of ground, and which, though its size argued the inhabitant to be a person of wealth, differed entirely from the tall, turretted, and castellated buildings in which the Norman nobility resided, and which had become the universal style of architecture throughout England.
Then," said Trefusis, extending his hand--Erskine at first thought for a hearty shake--"give me half-a-crown towards the cost of our expedition here to-day to assert the right of the people to tread the soil we are standing upon.
So far are the suggestions of Montesquieu from standing in opposition to a general Union of the States, that he explicitly treats of a confederate republic as the expedient for extending the sphere of popular government, and reconciling the advantages of monarchy with those of republicanism.