prescription

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prescription

 [pre-skrip´shun]
a written directive, as for the compounding or dispensing and administration of drugs, or for other service to a particular patient.

Federal law divides medicines into two main classes: prescription medicines and over-the-counter medicines. Dangerous, powerful, or habit-forming medicines to be used under a health care provider's supervision can be sold only by prescription. The prescription must be written by a physician, dentist, or advanced practice nurse; otherwise the pharmacist is forbidden to prepare and fill it.

There are four parts to a drug prescription. The first is the superscription, the symbol ℞ from the Latin recipe, meaning “take.” The second part is the inscription, specifying the ingredients and their quantities. The third part is the subscription, which tells the pharmacist how to compound the medicine. The fourth and last part is the signature; it is usually preceded by an S to represent the Latin signa, meaning “mark.” The signature is where the health care provider indicates what instructions are to be put on the outside of the package to tell the patient when and how to take the medicine and in what quantities. The pharmacist keeps a file of all the prescriptions filled.

pre·scrip·tion

(prē-skrip'shŭn),
1. A written formula for the preparation and administration of any remedy.
2. A medicinal preparation compounded according to formulated directions, said to consist of four parts: 1) superscription, consisting of the word recipe, take, or its sign, Rx; 2) inscription, the main part of the prescription, containing the names and amounts of the drugs ordered; 3) subscription, directions for mixing the ingredients and designation of the form (pill, powder, solution, etc.) in which the drug is to be made, usually beginning with the word, misce, mix, or its abbreviation, M.; 4) signature, directions to the patient regarding the dose and times of taking the remedy, preceded by the word signa, designate, or its abbreviation, S. or Sig.
[L. praescriptio; see prescribe]

prescription

/pre·scrip·tion/ (prĕ-skrip´shun) a written directive for the preparation and administration of a remedy; see also inscription, signature, subscription, and superscription.

prescription

(prĭ-skrĭp′shən)
n.
a. A written order, especially by a physician, for the preparation and administration of a medicine or other treatment.
b. A prescribed medicine or other treatment: Have you used up all of your prescription?
c. An ophthalmologist's or optometrist's written instruction, as for the grinding of corrective lenses.

prescription

[priskrip′shən]
an order for medication, therapy, or therapeutic device given by a properly authorized person, which ultimately goes to a person properly authorized to dispense or perform the order. A prescription is usually in written form; can be emailed from a secure encrypted computer system, written, phoned, or faxed; and includes the patient's name and address, the date, the ℞ symbol (superscription), the medication prescribed (inscription), directions to the pharmacist or other dispenser (subscription), the acceptability of dispensing a generic, directions to the patient that must appear on the label, prescriber's signature, and in some instances, an identifying number.

prescription

Pharmacology An order for drugs or medical supplies, written, signed or transmitted by word of mouth, telephone, or other means of communication to a pharmacist by a duly licensed physician, dentist, veterinarian or other practitioner, authorized by law to prescribe and administer such drugs or medical supplies. See Frontier prescription, Prescription.

pre·scrip·tion

(prĕ-skrip'shŭn)
1. A written formula for the preparation and administration of any remedy, consisting of four parts: 1) superscription, consisting of the word recipe, take, or its sign, Rx; 2) inscription, the main part of the prescription, containing the names and amounts of the drugs ordered; 3) subscription, directions for mixing the ingredients and designation of the form (pill, powder, solution) in which the drug is to be made; 4) signature, directions to the patient regarding the dose and times of taking the remedy.
2. A medicinal preparation compounded according to formulated directions.
See: prescribe

prescription

An instruction to a pharmacist, written by a doctor, to dispense a stated quantity of a particular drug in a specified dose. A prescription also contains instructions to the patient indicating how the drug is to be taken, how often, and for how long. These are usually computer-printed on the label by the pharmacist.

prescription

signed, written formula for a medicinal preparation, made out by a designated practitioner, and consisting of:
  • inscription names and amounts of drugs ordered

  • signature dose and times of dosing

  • subscription designated drug form

  • superscription recipient details

prescription (pri·skripˑ·shn),

n a written directive by an authorized person (e.g., a medical doctor) to an authorized agent (a pharmacist) to dispense a medication, device, or therapy to a specific patient for a specified period of time.

prescription 

A written formula for the preparation and administration of any treatment. At a minimum, medication prescriptions should include the name of the medication to be used, instructions for its usage and the amount of medication to be dispensed. A spectacle prescription may include a spherical component (often called the spherical error or the sphere), a cylindrical component (often called the cylindrical error), a prismatic component, an addition for near vision and the interpupillary distance. Example: +3.00 D (−1.50 D ✕ 90º) 1.5 ΧBI, OU add: +1.75 D, 64 mm. Prescriptions for contact lenses include very specific information regarding the lenses, besides the refraction adjusted for the corneal plane. The form and terminology nowadays usually conform to the recommendations of the International Standards Organization. See Rx.
Table P9 Abbreviations commonly used in prescriptions
abbreviationLatinmeaning
acante cibumbefore meals
ad libad libitumfreely, as desired
agit. ante usagita ante usumshake before taking
alt horalternis horisevery other hour
bidbis in dieuse twice a day
ccumwith
gttguttaedrops
odomni dieevery day
ohomni horaevery hour
omomni maneevery morning
onomni nocteevery night
pcpost cibumafter eating
poper osby mouth
prnpro re natause as needed
qdquaque in dieuse every day
qhquaque horause every hour
qidquater in dieuse four times a day
qlquantum libetas much as desired
ssinewithout
sigsignalabel
solnsolutiosolution
tabtabellatablet
tidter in dieuse three times a day
ungunguentumointment

pre·scrip·tion

(prĕ-skrip'shŭn)
Written formula for the preparation and administration of any remedy.

prescription (prēskrip´shən),

n a written direction for the preparation and use of medicine or an appliance; a medical recipe; a prescribed remedy. Also used in dentistry to describe the treatment plan.
prescription, extemporaneous,
n 1. (magistral prescription) a prescription for a nonofficial drug.
n 2. a prescription that directs the pharmacist to compound the specified medication, as contrasted with a prescription that specifies medication available in precompounded form.
prescription, magistral,
n See prescription, extemporaneous.
prescription, official,
n a prescription for an official drug.

prescription

a written directive, as for the compounding or dispensing and administration of drugs, or for other service to a particular patient. Any prescription relating to restricted drugs must be directed to a qualified pharmacist and can be authorized only by a registered veterinarian, dentist or medical practitioner.
There are four parts to a drug prescription. The first is the symbol - from the Latin recipe, meaning 'take'. This is the superscription. The second part is the inscription, specifying the ingredients and their quantities. The third part is the subscription, which tells the pharmacist how to compound the medicine. The signature is the last part, and it is usually preceded by an S or sig. to represent the Latin signa, meaning 'mark'. The signature is where the veterinarian indicates what instructions are to be put on the outside of the package to tell the patient when and how to take the medicine and in what quantities.
The pharmacist keeps a file of all the prescriptions he/she fills.

prescription drugs
drugs limited in their availability so that a prescription is needed to obtain them. Called also restricted substances.

Patient discussion about prescription

Q. What are some good non-prescription lotions for psoriasis

A. from some reason- bathing in the "dead sea" in Israel helps psoriasis. i know they sell mud from the dead sea in malls all over the U.S. try it- could be useful.

Q. Can you provide information about how depression can be cured without prescription medications? I was working at a MNC with a high designation. Because of the internal politics I was sent out with a label ‘irresponsible.’ Each and everyone on the chairman’s committee knows very well about my hard work and the benefits they had gotten because of me. This wrong news has gone down the corporate grapevine to other companies and they are not accepting my application. I went into depression and was sick. I have spent all my hard-earned money on medications. Now my pocket is empty. No-one is there to help. I don’t need money from you now but can you provide information about how depression can be cured without prescription medications?

A. kenn;;im not gonna hold your hand on this one,what has happened to you happens to others,forget about the depression meds...SHIT HAPPENS...you have to be strong...and get your life together...the way the world is today..with people losing there jobs..their homes and all of their money...your problem seems small...think about another kind of job...think about going to school for something else..your life has not ended because of this....spend your money on looking for something new..GET IT TOGETHER.....PEACE mrfoot56

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