exsert


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exsert

(ĭk-sûrt′)
tr.v. ex·serted, ex·serting, ex·serts
To thrust (something) out or forth; cause to protrude.
adj. also exserted (-sûr′tĭd)
Thrust outward or protruding, as stamens projecting beyond petals.

ex·ser′tion n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
11A, C): Translucent white to pale buff; diameter 360-380 um; globose, strongly exsert and somewhat tilted; terminal lip convex with sinusigera-like beak in mid region; surface sculptured with a fine irregular granulation and a faint spiral thread midway between sutures.
salpinx may be confused with those of Danilia textilis, but the latter have finer, more regularly cancellate sculpture, a sunken rather than an exsert protoconch and more rounded whorls with a more narrowly channelled suture.
46A, C): White, not exsert, slightly down-tilted and more or less level with first teleoconch whorl; diameter 260-290 [micro]m; terminal lip straight but with evidence of a small beak-like projection near adapical suture; superficial sculpture well developed, relatively coarse and widely spaced, arranged in irregular axial lines, with no spiral component evident.
48A, C): White, a little exsert and slightly down-tilted; diameter 280-300 [micro]m; lacking an apical beak; terminal lip more or less straight to weakly convex, and slightly flaring; superficial sculpture well developed, arranged in irregular axial lines, with no spiral element evident.
fascicularis exsert septa, determined by X-ray microanalysis, revealed that fusiform crystals were of a very similar elemental composition to the main skeletal component.
The structure of the exsert septum and the structure and location of the various crystal types is summarized in Figure 11.
All four crystal types found on the exsert septa of G.
Gladfelter (1982, 1983) hypothesized that fusiform crystals form a loose scaffolding on the surface of exsert septa at night and that acicular crystals nucleate on the fusiform crystals during the day, ultimately giving rise to fasciculi.
A female requiring 9 d to exsert 95% of the silks would produce 15% fewer kernels, and leave more than 50% of the exposed silks unpollinated (Fig.
This dynamic requires a simultaneous calculation of silks exserted per plant and an estimate of the percentage of plants beginning to exsert silks.
Each day, a new group of plants begins to exsert silk simultaneously with a second group in its second day of silk exsertion, along with those in their third day, and so on.