exsanguination


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exsanguination

 [eks-sang″gwĭ-na´shun]
extensive blood loss due to internal or external hemorrhage.

ex·san·gui·na·tion

(ek-sang'gwi-nā'shŭn),
Removal of blood; making exsanguine.

exsanguination

/ex·san·gui·na·tion/ (ek-sang″gwin-a´shun) extensive loss of blood due to internal or external hemorrhage.

exsanguination

[eksang′gwinā′shən]
a massive loss of blood.

exsanguination

Trauma surgery A condition that is “…the most extreme form of hemorrhage, with an initial blood loss of > 40% and ongoing bleeding which, if not surgically controlled, will lead to death.” See Salvage surgery–trauma, Staged surgery.

ex·san·gui·na·tion

(ek-sang'gwi-nā'shŭn)
Removal of blood; making exsanguine.

exsanguination

The loss of a substantial proportion, or almost the whole volume, of the blood. The result of a severe haemorrhage.

exsanguination

extensive blood loss due to internal or external hemorrhage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Samples were obtained from the core of the LD adjacent to the last rib from the left side of carcass immediately after exsanguination.
In our experience, the use of the S-MART exsanguination tourniquet is an effective and safe way to provide a bloodless field in hand and wrist surgery" (Templeton-Ward et al, 2014).
Sauaia et al reported that among trauma deaths within 48 hours of injury, exsanguination was the most common cause (51%) due to injuries to the liver, heart, or major blood vessels (7).
At the end of the 150-minute experimental period, blood samples were taken and all rats were killed by exsanguination.
5) In Vietnam, almost 40% of Soldiers who died of exsanguination had a source of bleeding that could possibly have been controlled by a hemostatic agent.
Spontaneous rupture of the uterus due to placenta percreta is one of the most urgent obstetrical complications resulting in rapid exsanguination and high mortality which is more commonly seen in the third trimester and is very rare in second trimester (3).
Aorta-conduit fistulae tend to present with a triad of symptoms, first described by Chiari-Strassburgh in 1914, of chest pain, sentinel haemorrhage and then finally exsanguination following a massive gastro-intestinal haemorrhage (5).
Left untreated, aortic diseases can rapidly lead to death by exsanguination.
13) When haemorrhage is ongoing fluid administration should be limited and a balance struck between maintaining organ perfusion and avoiding exsanguination, even if this means allowing a lower than normal blood pressure in the patient.
Among patients who did not survive their injuries, autopsy findings demonstrated that the principal cause of death in 74% was exsanguination, while MOF was the primary cause in 18%.
After assessment of paw preference the animals were anaesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (25 mg/kg; intravenous injection) and, in order to provide a better tissue fixation, sacrificed by exsanguination from the left carotid artery via a polyethylene cannula.