expressivity


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expressivity

 [eks″pres-iv´ĭ-te]
the extent to which a heritable trait is manifested by an individual carrying the principal gene or genes that determine it.

ex·pres·siv·i·ty

(eks'pres-siv'i-tē),
In clinical genetics, the degree of severity in which a gene is manifested.

expressivity

/ex·pres·siv·i·ty/ (eks″pres-siv´ĭ-te) in genetics, the extent to which an inherited trait is manifested by an individual.

expressivity

(ĕk′sprĕ-sĭv′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. expressivi·ties
1. The quality of being expressive.
2. Genetics The degree to which an expressed gene produces its effects in an organism.

expressivity

[eks′presiv′itē]
Etymology: L, exprimere, to make clear
the variability with which basic patterns of inheritance are modified, both in degree and in variety, by the effect of a given gene in people of the same genotype. For example, polydactyly may be expressed as extra toes in one generation and extra fingers in another.

expressivity

The degree of severity shown by an AUTOSOMAL dominant trait in any particular affected individual. The main feature of expressivity is its variability.

expressivity

the degree to which a particular gene exhibits itself in the PHENOTYPE of an organism, once it has undergone PENETRANCE. Thus, for example, a penetrant baldness gene in man can have a wide range of expressivity, from thinning hair to complete lack of hair.

expressivity,

n variance in the inheritance patterns of genes in people with a common genotype—for instance, polydactyly being expressed as extra fingers in one generation and extra toes in the next.

expressivity

The extent to which an inherited trait or disease is manifested in the phenotype. It is a qualitative evaluation unlike penetrance. Syn. expression.

expressivity

the extent to which a heritable trait is manifested by an individual carrying the principal gene or genes that determine it. Called also genetic expressivity.

Patient discussion about expressivity

Q. where do the expression "going back on the wagon " come from?

A. http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/on-the-wagon.html

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

More discussions about expressivity
References in periodicals archive ?
The predominance of the poetic function in classic ballet is demonstrated by the strict encoding of the forms of choreographic expressivity, reduced to a canonical (vocabulary) inventory and by their strict obeyance.
Because the analyses are so engaged with expressivity, performers too, will likely find many of them enlightening and perhaps critical in helping to hone their interpretations.
Some motives are easily classified as elements of an efficiency principle (the motives under A, C, and E), while others are recognizable as elements of an expressivity principle (the motives under F as well as "emotionality of a concept," "desire for plasticity," "taboo/PC," "new concept").
8) For these and other linguistic approaches to expressivity, see Willemse.
There are many examples reported in the literature that demonstrate variable expressivity of a genotype within the same family.
Based on our findings, we have concluded that agenesis involving the maxillary lateral incisors could be determined by an autosomal dominant gene of incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity.
The repetition--endlessly duplicated lines and recurring motifs--is like a screen on which the real trauma of the infinitely reproduced image, of the nonhuman expressivity of mass production, of flat pop culture as the new folk culture, plays out in its historical singularity.
They move in unison and successive motion with strong grace that only occasionally lapses into slightly chaotic expressivity.
Certainly the movement gave each of the players - violinists Weigang Li and Yi-Wen Jiang, violist Honggang Li and cellist Nicholas Tzavaras - an opportunity to play with perfervid expressivity and glowing warmth.
Beyond them rises the strange hyperbolic tent of his 1958 Philips Pavilion-a synthesis of numerical series and acute expressivity in a spatial analogue of Xenakis' music Metastasis.
The range of expressivity can be more dramatic than what appears common in the English-speaking world.
No small part of what made Rauschenberg's work of the 1950's and early 60's so strong was that its claimed absence of expressivity and reference was repeatedly contravened on its richly expressive and referential surfaces.