expressive language disorder


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Related to expressive language disorder: Mixed receptive-expressive language disorder, receptive language disorder

expressive language disorder

a communication disorder in children and adults, characterized by problems with expression of language, either oral or signed. It includes difficulties such as limited speech or vocabulary, vocabulary errors, difficulty or hesitation in word selection, oversimplification of grammatical or sentence structure, omission of parts of sentences, unusual word order, and slowed acquisition of language skills. Two types are recognized, acquired and developmental.

expressive language disorder

Neurology A disorder resulting in ability below that expected in vocabulary, production of complex sentences, and word recall Etiology Idiopathic, brain damage, head trauma, malnutrition

ex·pres·sive lan·guage dis·or·der

(eks-pres'iv lang'gwăj dis-ōr'dĕr)
Any problem related to oral communication; may have physical or emotional causes.

expressive language disorder

Failure of a child to learn how to speak, write, or use sign language properly, despite having normal understanding of language and otherwise normal cognitive functions. The impairment in language use is apparent in the child's abnormal composition of sentences, frequent grammatical errors, limited word choices, and difficulty in learning new vocabulary.
References in periodicals archive ?
A child with a writing disability, particularly an expressive language disorder, might be unable to compose complete, grammatical sentences.
While definitions are somewhat different and numbers of cases are given rather than percentages, the number of expressive language disorders is greater than receptive cases, and overlap (i.
Central auditory processing disorders (CAPD) often result in both receptive and expressive language disorders, and children with language impairments exhibit a five times greater chance of developing reading problems (Gillon, 2001).