expressivity

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Related to expressive: Expressive language disorder

expressivity

 [eks″pres-iv´ĭ-te]
the extent to which a heritable trait is manifested by an individual carrying the principal gene or genes that determine it.

ex·pres·siv·i·ty

(eks'pres-siv'i-tē),
In clinical genetics, the degree of severity in which a gene is manifested.

expressivity

/ex·pres·siv·i·ty/ (eks″pres-siv´ĭ-te) in genetics, the extent to which an inherited trait is manifested by an individual.

expressivity

(ĕk′sprĕ-sĭv′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. expressivi·ties
1. The quality of being expressive.
2. Genetics The degree to which an expressed gene produces its effects in an organism.

expressivity

[eks′presiv′itē]
Etymology: L, exprimere, to make clear
the variability with which basic patterns of inheritance are modified, both in degree and in variety, by the effect of a given gene in people of the same genotype. For example, polydactyly may be expressed as extra toes in one generation and extra fingers in another.

expressivity

The degree of severity shown by an AUTOSOMAL dominant trait in any particular affected individual. The main feature of expressivity is its variability.

expressivity

the degree to which a particular gene exhibits itself in the PHENOTYPE of an organism, once it has undergone PENETRANCE. Thus, for example, a penetrant baldness gene in man can have a wide range of expressivity, from thinning hair to complete lack of hair.

expressivity,

n variance in the inheritance patterns of genes in people with a common genotype—for instance, polydactyly being expressed as extra fingers in one generation and extra toes in the next.

expressivity

The extent to which an inherited trait or disease is manifested in the phenotype. It is a qualitative evaluation unlike penetrance. Syn. expression.

expressivity

the extent to which a heritable trait is manifested by an individual carrying the principal gene or genes that determine it. Called also genetic expressivity.

Patient discussion about expressivity

Q. where do the expression "going back on the wagon " come from?

A. http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/on-the-wagon.html

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

More discussions about expressivity
References in periodicals archive ?
This newfound focus on the therapeutic benefits of expressive art has mainly been studied in mental health, pediatric, and occasionally geriatric settings for clients living with chronic illness or who are survivors of abuse (Cardinale, Malacari, Broggi, Savignano, & Fisher, 2014; Gross, Hayne, & Drury, 2009; Gunnarsson & Eklund, 2009; Kato & Morita, 2010; Katz & Hershkowitz, 2010; Lev-Wiesel & Liraz, 2007; Patterson & Hayne, 2011; Perruzza & Kinsella, 2010; Symons et al.
Encouraging your patients to use expressive writing is simple.
Here, 82 per cent of the children chose to seek information about the new animal from the properly expressive robot as opposed to its partner.
One group performed a traditional expressive writing task, with instructions to write freely about their "strongest and deepest emotions.
Table 1: Experiment1: Results of statistics tests Dependent Prestige Social self- Inner self- Uniqueness variables value expressive expressive value value value 444.
Another potential reason for the marginalization of expressive mechanisms from law and economics is concerns about the complexity of expressive mechanisms, which some argue negatively affects their ability to be used predictively.
A different sort of exponent of law's expressive power might have concluded that his discovery illuminated why enforcement of a nonestablishment norm under should be presumptively disfavored.
taking and video recording are often not expressive, (7) but courts have
In previous papers (Steriopolo 2008, 2009), I showed that there are two classes of expressive suffixes in Russian: attitude and size suffixes.
This study examined the expressive communication behaviors of a child with ASD as his speech generating device was introduced, discontinued, and resumed over a period of approximately six years.
Filipinos are said to be the most expressive about love among their peers in the Asia Pacific, the results of a recent survey said.
Synopsis: The collaborative work of James Pennebaker and John Evans, "Expressive Writing: Words that Heal" provides research results, articulated in layman's terms, which demonstrate how and when expressive writing can improve health.