expressivity

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Related to expressive: Expressive language disorder

expressivity

 [eks″pres-iv´ĭ-te]
the extent to which a heritable trait is manifested by an individual carrying the principal gene or genes that determine it.

ex·pres·siv·i·ty

(eks'pres-siv'i-tē),
In clinical genetics, the degree of severity in which a gene is manifested.

expressivity

/ex·pres·siv·i·ty/ (eks″pres-siv´ĭ-te) in genetics, the extent to which an inherited trait is manifested by an individual.

expressivity

(ĕk′sprĕ-sĭv′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. expressivi·ties
1. The quality of being expressive.
2. Genetics The degree to which an expressed gene produces its effects in an organism.

expressivity

[eks′presiv′itē]
Etymology: L, exprimere, to make clear
the variability with which basic patterns of inheritance are modified, both in degree and in variety, by the effect of a given gene in people of the same genotype. For example, polydactyly may be expressed as extra toes in one generation and extra fingers in another.

expressivity

The degree of severity shown by an AUTOSOMAL dominant trait in any particular affected individual. The main feature of expressivity is its variability.

expressivity

the degree to which a particular gene exhibits itself in the PHENOTYPE of an organism, once it has undergone PENETRANCE. Thus, for example, a penetrant baldness gene in man can have a wide range of expressivity, from thinning hair to complete lack of hair.

expressivity,

n variance in the inheritance patterns of genes in people with a common genotype—for instance, polydactyly being expressed as extra fingers in one generation and extra toes in the next.

expressivity

The extent to which an inherited trait or disease is manifested in the phenotype. It is a qualitative evaluation unlike penetrance. Syn. expression.

expressivity

the extent to which a heritable trait is manifested by an individual carrying the principal gene or genes that determine it. Called also genetic expressivity.

Patient discussion about expressivity

Q. where do the expression "going back on the wagon " come from?

A. http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/on-the-wagon.html

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

More discussions about expressivity
References in classic literature ?
Your youngest daughter--her with the expressive hi--have paid me far beyond what is proper.
Her eyes were bright and dark and expressive, her movements graceful, her foot charming.
Speeches, therefore, which do not make this manifest, or in which the speaker does not choose or avoid anything whatever, are not expressive of character.
Madame de Villefort became very pale, and, seizing her son's arm, drew him anxiously toward her; but, once satisfied of his safety, she also cast a brief but expressive glance on the casket, which was not lost upon the count.
He was interrupted by the hunter, who held up his finger with an expressive gesture for silence.
It had been one of the wonders of their intercourse that from the first, she, the quicker, finer, more expressive, instead of crushing him by the contrast, had given him something of her own ease and freedom; but now he felt as heavy and loutish as in his student days, when he had tried to "jolly" the Worcester girls at a picnic.
To follow that way is an initiation, by which they will become able to distinguish, in art, speech, feeling, manners, in men and life generally, what is genuine, animated, and expressive from what is only conventional and derivative, and therefore inexpressive.
The whole figure and air, good and amiable otherwise, might be called flabby and irresolute, expressive of weakness under possibility of strength .
Expressive of Lady Lundie's view of your sudden departure from the house.
Then, I said, we must take Damon into our counsels; and he will tell us what rhythms are expressive of meanness, or insolence, or fury, or other unworthiness, and what are to be reserved for the expression of opposite feelings.
There was even an ease and cheerfulness about her air and manner that I made no pretension to; but there was a depth of malice in her too expressive eye that plainly told me I was not forgiven; for, though she no longer hoped to win me to herself, she still hated her rival, and evidently delighted to wreak her spite on me.
Other singers are there, to be sure, to whom only the full house maketh the voice soft, the hand eloquent, the eye expressive, the heart wakeful:-- those do I not resemble.