expression


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expression

 [eks-presh´un]
1. the aspect or appearance of the face as determined by the physical or emotional state.
2. the act of squeezing out or evacuating by pressure.
gene expression
1. the flow of genetic information from gene to protein.
2. the process, or the regulation of the process, by which the effects of a gene are manifested.
3. the manifestation of a heritable trait in an individual carrying the gene or genes that determine it.

ex·pres·sion

(eks-presh'ŭn),
1. Squeezing out; expelling by pressure.
2. Mobility of the features giving a particular emotional significance to the face. Synonym(s): facies (4) [TA]
3. Any act by a person.
4. Something that manifests something else.
5. The act of allowing information to become manifest.
6. A mathematical function consisting of a combination of constants, variables, other functions, and mathematical operations.

expression

/ex·pres·sion/ (eks-presh´un)
1. the aspect or appearance of the face as determined by the physical or emotional state.
2. the act of squeezing out or evacuating by pressure.

gene expression 
1. the flow of genetic information from gene to protein.
2. the process, or the regulation thereof, by which the effects of a gene are manifested.
3. the manifestation of a heritable trait.

expression

(ĭk-sprĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of pressing or squeezing out.
2. Genetics The act or process of expressing a gene.

expression

[ikspresh′ən]
Etymology: L, exprimere, to express
1 the indication of a physical or emotional state through facial appearance or vocal intonation.
2 the act of pressing or squeezing to expel something, such as milk from the breast when lactating or the fetus from the uterus by exertion of pressure on the abdominal wall.
3 (in genetics) the detectable effect or appearance in the phenotype of a particular trait or condition. See also expressivity. express, v.

ex·pres·sion

(eks-presh'ŭn)
1. Squeezing out; expelling by pressure.
2. Mobility of the features giving a particular emotional significance to the face.
Synonym(s): facies (3) [TA] .
3. Something that manifests something else.
[L. pp. expressus, fr. exprimere, to press out]

expression

see GENE EXPRESSION.

expression

physiological manifestation of gene activity

expression (ek·spreˑ·shn),

n the mechanical method used to extract essential oils from plant material by crushing and applying pressure. Commonly used for extracting fluids from citrus fruits like lemons and oranges.

ex·pres·sion

(eks-presh'ŭn)
1. Squeezing out; expelling by pressure.
2. Mobility of the features giving a particular emotional significance to the face.
Synonym(s): facies (4) [TA] .

expression

1. the aspect or appearance of the face as determined by the physical or emotional state.
2. the act of squeezing out or evacuating by pressure.
3. the manifestation of a heritable trait in an individual carrying the gene or genes which determine it.

expression library
a number of different DNA molecules cloned into a single expression vector.
expression vector
a cloning vector that carries a gene into the host cell and promotes its expression.

Patient discussion about expression

Q. where do the expression "going back on the wagon " come from?

A. http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/on-the-wagon.html

Q. What role does emotion have in the life of someone with autism? I just find the whole disorder of autism hard to understand because I'm a really emotional person. I'm especially interested in how people with mild autism or Asperger's can function fine but then when it comes to feeling empathy they have such trouble. I guess my question is how such people experience emotion--are these people actually unable to care about others? My intention is not to sound ignorant, I'm genuinely curious.

A. I have asperger's and most everything for me is logically analyzed and I have a difficulty knowing what emotion goes with certain situations and how the emotion manifests itself within me.
I care about others, I just cannot always put myself in their shoes and feel what they are feeling.

More discussions about expression
References in classic literature ?
Suppose, then, that the expressions defining the authority of the convention were irreconcilably at variance with each other; that a NATIONAL and ADEQUATE GOVERNMENT could not possibly, in the judgment of the convention, be affected by ALTERATIONS and PROVISIONS in the ARTICLES OF CONFEDERATION; which part of the definition ought to have been embraced, and which rejected?
I see nothing wrong with my expression of interest in this red woman," retorted Sola.
Her voice, of immense power and sublime expression, gave to the rude, unpolished poetry of these psalms a magic and an effect which the most exalted Puritans rarely found in the songs of their brethren, and which they were forced to ornament with all the resources of their imagination.
The old man's eyes beamed with an expression of gentle affection.
The recollection of what I then said, of my conduct, my manners, my expressions during the whole of it, is now, and has been many months, inexpressibly painful to me.
He forgot his solo, and the expected compliments; and, for the rest of the evening, that thrilling expression floated in his brain, and was present to his thoughts; it was worth a thousand of the studied glances that were continually aimed at him from all sides of the room, and with every variety of eye--from the piercing black, to the ogling gray.
A woman's eye can read the face of the man she loves, its every feeling of pride, its every expression of suffering; it might almost be said that Heaven has graciously granted to women, on account of their very weakness, more than it has accorded to other creatures.
In this second group were several girls with exquisite figures and distinguished features, but there was little in their glance or expression that was simple and candid.
a masqueline shaving-glass - that I caught my second glimpse of my landlady's evil expression - levelled this time at myself.
I am willing to believe that the eye of the practiced artist can rest upon the Last Supper and renew a lustre where only a hint of it is left, supply a tint that has faded away, restore an expression that is gone; patch, and color, and add, to the dull canvas until at last its figures shall stand before him aglow with the life, the feeling, the freshness, yea, with all the noble beauty that was theirs when first they came from the hand of the master.
Tarzan shook his head, and an expression of wistful and pathetic longing sobered his laughing eyes.
From time to time she smoothed the folds of her dress, and whenever the story produced an effect she glanced at Anna Pavlovna, at once adopted just the expression she saw on the maid of honor's face, and again relapsed into her radiant smile.